inelastic

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inelastic

 [in″e-las´tik]
lacking elasticity.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

inelastic

(ĭn″ē-lăs′tĭk) [L. in-, not, + Gr. elastikos, elastic]
Not elastic.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Under the assumptions that inelasticity remains constant at about 0.35 at LHC energies and that the extrapolation of the [e.sup.+][e.sup.-] data with the QCD formis still reliable, authors fit the p+p([bar.p]) data to predict the multiplicities at the LHC.
The inelasticity of the surrounding tissue of the MA can let the hematoma form a PA, above all in those tracts more compressed by dense connective tissues.
(12) Henri Bergson explains the humor of facial expressions in terms of the mechanical as well, asserting, "Automatism, inelasticity, habit that has been contracted and maintained, are clearly the causes why a face makes us laugh" (25, italics in original).
We are making a point about the inelasticity of healthcare and the elasticity of education and what this means for a strategic use of public funds to achieve long term development goals.
The academic journal publishing industry is characterized by inefficiency brought upon by a double-appropriation model, a structure of oligopoly, and price inelasticity. At the same time, the industry is unique in that the major inputs for publishers are provided for free by academics: scholars provide these inputs for free not completely out of goodwill, but in return for the "prestige" and "symbolic capital" of publishing in a well-regarded journal (on "prestige" in scholarship see Kirby <http://thedisorderofthings.com/2013/07/25/onrejecting-journals/>; on "symbolic capital" and publishing scholarship see Michalski [see also Bourdieu]).
Recall that price rigidity, whether in the form of a fixed price, a (monopoly/oligopoly) sticky price, or price inelasticity generates market disequilibrium and quantitative adjustment, i.e., rationing (Benassy, 1982).
inelasticity of fuel consumption and its leading market shares, which
This was probably due to the inelasticity of Sweden's balance of trade to the fluctuations in the real exchange rate.
The second section examines the problem of the upward and downward inelasticity of the currency.
Price inelasticity remains good, but the current market conditions will constrain price increases.
Unfortunately, as a growing economy, we have huge energy requirements and much of our energy is imported, so we will continue to suffer from inelasticity of energy import bill as well.
Demand for silver is made up largely of industrial demand, but given the inelasticity of this source of demand, investor flows typically drive silver prices more aggressively than gold.