inelastic

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inelastic

 [in″e-las´tik]
lacking elasticity.

inelastic

(ĭn″ē-lăs′tĭk) [L. in-, not, + Gr. elastikos, elastic]
Not elastic.

inelastic

1. tissue lacking in elasticity.
2. in financial terms, lack of response in a variable, e.g. inelastic demand, when the demand for, say, veterinary services is not reduced by a downturn in the local economy.
References in periodicals archive ?
As assumed above, all workers inelastically supply one unit of labor; therefore the full employment of skilled workers requires that
Assume also that each worker will supply inelastically a unit of labor.
Because land is ultimately inelastically supplied, this naturally creates a limit on the supply of new housing at construction costs.
Suppose that the government's budget is balanced initially and that a decision to subsidize kidney transplants requires the introduction of a tax on a relatively inelastically demanded good.
If some of his workers are supplied inelastically, the employer will try to pass on the costs by reducing other workers' average wage; or, if labor is supplied elastically, he will lay off nondisabled workers from jobs in which they would otherwise be efficiently employed.
This technology measures the wavelength and intensity of light inelastically scattered by molecules.
Magnesium is a favorite for racing components because of its light weight and high stiffness-to-weight ratio, enabling it to resist deflection and absorb energy inelastically.
Most of the light is scattered elastically (Rayleigh scatter), but a small fraction is scattered inelastically (Raman scatter).
The FME is defined as the displacement at which the structure starts to deform inelastically (anticipated yield displacement).
Arab governments are almost inelastically demanding close to $10 billion a year in telecommunications technology.
Neutrons can also scatter inelastically, to reveal the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of a material over wide ranges of energy (from about [10.
109]Cd [Gamma]-rays can also elastically scatter off of the calcium and phosphorus (and, to a lesser extent, oxygen) atoms in bone and inelastically scatter off all of the elements in the sample undergoing measurement (principally the bone, soft tissue, and skin).