deformation

(redirected from inelastic deformation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

/de·for·ma·tion/ (de″for-ma´shun)
1. in dysmorphology, a type of structural defect characterized by the abnormal form or position of a body part, caused by a nondisruptive mechanical force.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
References in periodicals archive ?
Length-scale effects in inelastic deformations with large strain gradients exist in glassy polystyrene.
In these composites, the contribution of fiber fragmentation events to the onset of inelastic deformations at [[Epsilon].
This expression was used in combination with typical equations of plasticity, regarding inelastic deformations.
For the amorphous polymers, the volumetric strain ceases to decrease after the yield peak and is held constant in spite of an increase in the inelastic deformation.
This inelastic deformation is in the form of crazes, which usually initiate at a stress concentration site.
The new constitutive theory developed in this paper uses continuum damage and plasticity to describe all the inelastic deformation mechanisms exhibited by rigid polyurethane foam.
Structural damage measures are related to story drifts, inelastic deformations and residual drifts.
During strong earthquakes, structural walls will likely undergo inelastic deformations (Wallace and Moehle, 1992).
Often structures that undergo inelastic deformations and cyclic behavior weaken and lose some of their stiffness and strength.
This can result in a building design that does not fully take advantage of its ability to accommodate inelastic deformations, which can, in return, result in extra construction costs.
Another form of answer is by means of inelastic deformations, once deformed the object, this is not able to recover the original form.