deformation

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deformation

 [de″for-ma´shun]
1. deformity, especially an alteration in shape or structure.
2. the process of adapting in shape or form.
elastic deformation temporary elongation of tissue when a prolonged force has been applied. See also creep.
plastic deformation permanent elongation of tissue when a prolonged nondisruptive mechanical force has been applied. See also creep.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē'fōr-mā'shŭn),
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of an organ or other body part; etiology may be developmental, posttraumatic, hereditary, or postsurgical, or due to pathologic conditions in adjacent structures (for example, compression by a tumor mass).
2. In rheology, the change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

deformation

(dē′fôr-mā′shən, dĕf′ər-)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deforming.
b. The condition of being deformed.
2. An alteration of form for the worse.
3. Physics
a. An alteration of shape, as by pressure or stress.
b. The shape that results from such an alteration.

de′for·ma′tion·al adj.
Any change in the normal size or shape of a part

deformation

Deformity Neonatology A change from the normal size or shape of a part that differentiates normally, but cannot develop fully due to in utero constraints–eg, compression, or oligohydramnios. See Defect, Dysmorphology.

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
1. Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape or structure of a previously normally formed part. It occurs after organogenesis and often involves the musculoskeletal system (e.g., clubfoot).
2. Synonym(s): deformity.
3. rheology The change in the physical shape of a mass by applied stress.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]

de·for·ma·tion

(dē-fōr-mā'shŭn)
Deviation of form from normal; specifically, an alteration in shape and/or structure of a body part.
[L. de-formo, pp. -atus, to deform, fr. forma, form]
References in periodicals archive ?
This work monitored the performance deterioration of the scale models of a typical heavy-haul railway bridge under fatigue loading, analyzed the results of the failure mode, the fatigue life, the loads-midspan deflection response and the materials strain development, and so forth, by using a multisensor system, and further developed the comprehensive S-N model and the damage evolution model considering the coupling of stiffness degradation and inelastic deformation. The conclusions are able to be drawn as follows:
Change in [[eta].sup.Misses.sub.i] under Relaxation Process of Elastic and Inelastic Deformation. To further explain the phenomenon of the x-displacement in the relaxation process, we use the atomic local shear strain [[eta].sup.Misses.sub.i] as a structural indicator to monitor deformation processes [27].
Caption: Figure 6: Inelastic deformation during the cyclic loading process.
In all cases, X-braces are designed to sustain large inelastic deformations without experiencing premature buckling failures.
In the case of long-term inelastic deformation, the complexity of the solution leads to the necessity of storing an extensive information and performing vast computations to allow for the deformation history.
Epoxy glass is often subjected to inelastic deformation as in the case where the surface plates are tightly bolted to framework.
Knowledge of size dependencies in inelastic deformation is far less developed for polymers.
The mechanism of inelastic deformation in glassy polymers might be craze formation or shear banding: see Hertzberg (3).
This approach also requires a significant amount of iPP inelastic deformation to produce large strains.
A superimposed tensile hydrostatic stress increases the volume, and the molecular arrangement will be less dense, and thus resistance to the inelastic deformation will decrease.
Amoedo and Lee (9) proposed a model to describe the large inelastic deformation of glassy and semicrystalline polymers based on isotropic formulations of viscoplasticity.