erythropoiesis

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erythropoiesis

 [ĕ-rith″ro-poi-e´sis]
the formation of erythrocytes; called also erythrogenesis. adj., adj erythropoiet´ic.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis),
The formation of red blood cells.
Synonym(s): erythrocytopoiesis
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

erythropoiesis

(ĭ-rĭth′rō-poi-ē′sĭs)
n.
The formation or production of red blood cells.

e·ryth′ro·poi·et′ic (-ĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis)
The formation of red blood cells.
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

erythropoiesis

Red cell production.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

erythropoiesis

the formation of blood cells in bone marrow.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Erythropoiesis

The process through which new red blood cells are created; it begins in the bone marrow.
Mentioned in: Porphyrias
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·ryth·ro·poi·e·sis

(ĕ-rith'rō-poy-ē'sis)
Formation of red blood cells.
[erythrocyte + G. poiēsis, a making]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Yuan et al., "Programmed cell death (PCD) and ineffective erythropoiesis in Cooley's anemia," Blood, vol.
Ineffective erythropoiesis in beta-thalassemia is characterized by increased iron absorption mediated by down-regulation of hepcidin and up-regulation of ferroportin.
[12] Tumor necrosis factor-alpha has also been implicated and may cause ineffective erythropoiesis. [13]
The consequences of ineffective erythropoiesis on hepcidin expression thus appear to trump the consequences of excessive iron stores.
Ineffective erythropoiesis in beta thalassemia is characterized by increased iron absorption mediated by down regulation of hepcidin and up regulation of ferroportin.
The inability to produce AY-globin chains allows the a-globin chains to accumulate and precipitate within erythroid precursors in the bone marrow.4 Typically, AY-thalassaemia is characterised by moderate to severe anaemia, caused by haemolysis and ineffective erythropoiesis. The other signs, frequently observed in thalassaemic patients, include skeletal and/or endocrine changes and spleenomegaly, diarrhoea, irritability, fever, feeding problems and gradual bulging of the abdomen due to spleen and liver enlargement.5
When anemia is accompanied by increased erythroid activity and/or ineffective erythropoiesis, e.g., in case of thalassemia and sideroblastic anemia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, and some myelodysplastic disorders, there is an appropriately increased absorption of iron from the diet because of higher needs of iron for hemoglobin synthesis (20,21).
The major factors causing black pigment stones are haemolytic anaemias, ineffective erythropoiesis and increased production of bilirubin (caused by hereditary spherocytosis, thalassaemia, sickle cell disease, liver cirrhosis, malaria and ineffective erythropoiesis).
This leads to excessive accumulation of alpha chains, which precipitate and cause lipid peroxidation of red cell membrane leading to haemolysis, ineffective erythropoiesis and severe anaemia.1
Transferrin receptor concentrations are increased in disorders with expanded erythropoiesis, such as hemolytic anemias [15, 16, 18], and in conditions associated with ineffective erythropoiesis, such as myelodysplastic syndromes and megaloblastic anemias [21, 22].
[6] and maintaining the circulating level of haemoglobin (Hb) sufficient to suppress endogenous ineffective erythropoiesis. [7,8]
Expansion of haemopoietic marrow due to ineffective erythropoiesis causes mechanical interruption of bone formation and results in cortical thinning and fractures, as are also obvious in the radiographs of our patient (Figures-1 and 2).

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