inebriety


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in·e·bri·e·ty

(in'ē-brī'ĕ-tē),
Habitual indulgence in alcoholic beverages in excessive amounts.
[L. in- intensive + ebrietas, drunkenness]

inebriety

Drunkenness.

in·e·bri·e·ty

(in'ē-brī'ĕ-tē)
Habitual excessive indulgence in alcoholic beverages.
[L. in- intensive + ebrietas, drunkenness]
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References in periodicals archive ?
[167.] Mellanby E: Alcohol and alcoholic intoxication; Brit J Inebriety 17:157; 1920.
Young, "Adaptability in Sexual Offenders at Convict Prisons and its Relation to Alcohol," British Journal of Inebriety, 27 (1929), pp.
Within the literature, there has been a particular focus on the concept of inebriety, covering both drink and other drugs.
Cover with Your veil the one with overflowing inebriety caused by the love of the world, the one whose inner reality is dead with regard to the contemplation of the visions of the Hereafter.
with a sort of mental inebriety" and culminating in his own "shout of laughter that echoed through the street," Robin's "shout" being "the loudest there" (229-30), is an "irreversible surrender of the separateness of his self, and an initiation into the guilt of the baiting crowd" that results in his "change of allegiance" (27).
Acts 203 (entitled "An Act relative to the commitment of women subject to dipsomania or inebriety").
The Quarterly Journal of Inebriety 26:308-309, 1904.
Mulhall, "The Cigarette Habit," Quarterly Journal of Inebriety 20 (1895), abstracted in the American Journal of Insanity 52 (1896): 430.
But the linking of opium with alcohol in the supposedly scientific concept of 'inebriety' meant that the drug, as much as alcohol, was viewed very much in the context of the temperance views which informed the work of medical men in this field' Opium and the People: Opiate Use in Nineteenth-Century England (London and New York: Allen Lane/St.
"A man perpetually in the paroxysm and fears of inebriety is like a half-drowned stupid wretch condemned to labour unceasingly in water; but a now-and-then tribute to Bacchus is like the cold bath, bracing and invigorating."
Psychologically, the mental states of those anonymous and pseudonymous online debaters are like having the valiancy in inebriety while just a little more sober than a drunkard.
Bannister exhibited a specimen of brutified inebriety, where the mental and corporeal faculties were equally subdued.