induction


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Related to induction: induction heating, labor induction

induction

 [in-duk´shun]
1. the process or act of causing to occur.
2. the production of a specific morphogenetic effect in the embryo through evocators or organizers, or the production of anesthesia or unconsciousness by use of appropriate agents.
3. the generation of an electric current or magnetic properties in a body because of its proximity to an electrified or magnetized object.
4. reasoning from particular instances to general conclusions.
labor induction in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as initiation or augmentation of labor by mechanical or pharmacological methods.
ovulation induction treatment of infertility in the female by administration of hormones that stimulate the ovaries.

in·duc·tion

(in-dŭk'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with inducement.
1. Production or causation.
See also: inducer.
2. Production of an electric current or magnetic state in a body by electricity or magnetism in an adjacent body.
See also: inducer.
3. The period from the start of anesthetization to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for a surgical procedure.
See also: inducer.
4. In embryology, the influence exerted by an organizer or evocator on the differentiation of adjacent cells or on the development of an embryonic structure.
See also: inducer.
5. A modification imposed on an offspring by the action of the environment on the germ cells of one or both parents.
See also: inducer.
6. In microbiology, the change from probacteriophage to vegetative phage that may occur spontaneously or after stimulation by certain physical and chemical agents.
See also: inducer.
7. In enzymology, the process of increasing the amount or the activity of a protein.
See also: inducer.
8. A stage in the process of hypnosis.
9. Causal analysis; a method of reasoning in which an inference is made from one or more specific observations to a more general statement. Compare: deduction.
10. Inactivation of a repressor in gene regulation.
[L. inductio, a leading in]

induction

(ĭn-dŭk′shən)
n.
The act or process of inducing or bringing about, as:
a. Medicine The inducing of labor, whereby labor is initiated artificially with drugs such as oxytocin.
b. Medicine The administration of anesthetic agents and the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for surgery.
c. Biochemistry The process of initiating or increasing the production of an enzyme, as in genetic transcription.
d. Embryology The process by which one part of an embryo causes adjacent tissues or parts to change form or shape, as by the diffusion of hormones or other chemicals.

induction

Anaesthesiology
The process of “sleeping” a patient using anaesthetics to transition the patient from fully awake to the unconscious state of general anaesthesia. The induction technique used reflects patient and surgical factors, as well as anaesthetist preference and level of experience. 

EBM
Reasoning from the results of specific circumstance to reach conclusions about a theory—i.e., from specific to general.
 
Embryology
An interaction between cells or groups of cells that affects differentiation.

Molecular biology
The upregulation of transcription in a repressed system due to the interaction between the inducer and a regulatory protein—e.g., lac operon is induced by adding lactose or IPTG.
 
Obstetrics
Induction of labour, see there.
 
Oncology
(1) Induction chemotherapy, see there.
(2) Induction of remission, see there.

Psychology
In Hoffman's typology of discipline styles, induction is a form of verbal reasoning in which a parent (or other carer) induces the child to think about his or her actions and the consequences on others.

Vox populi
Logical thought process in which generalisations are developed from specific observations: reasoning moves from the particular to the general.

induction

Obstetrics Induction of labor, see there Oncology
1. Induction chemotherapy, see there.
2. Induction of remission, see there.

in·duc·tion

(in-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Production or causation.
2. Production of an electric current or magnetic state in a body by electricity or magnetism in another body close to the first body.
3. The period from the start of anesthesia to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for a surgical procedure.
4. embryology The influence exerted by an organizer or evocator on the differentiation of adjacent cells or on the development of an embryonic structure.
5. A modification imposed on the offspring by the action of environment on the germ cells of one or both parents.
6. microbiology A change from probacteriophage to vegetative phage, which may occur spontaneously or after stimulation by certain physical and chemical agents.
7. enzymology The process of increasing the amount or the activity of a protein.
See also: inducer
8. A stage in the process of hypnosis.
9. Causal analysis; a method of reasoning in which an inference is made from one or more specific observations to a more general statement.
Compare: deduction
[L. inductio, a leading in]

induction

  1. (in biochemistry) the synthesis of new proteins, particularly enzymes, in response to a stimulus that may be a chemical compound or a physical agent such as heat. see OPERON MODEL.
  2. (in embryology) the formation of an alternative cell type during CELL DIFFERENTIATION under the influence of an ‘inducer’ molecule.
  3. (virology) the production of virus particles from a cell harbouring a PROPHAGE or PROVIRUS, initiated by, for example, ultraviolet light.

induction

The production of an effect by indirect or asynchronized stimulation.
colour induction The modification or generation of colour perception without direct stimulation of the corresponding cones. See after-image; Benham's top; Bidwell's ghost.
spatial induction Modification of perception as a result of a simultaneous stimulation in another part of the visual field. See summation.
temporal induction Modification of perception as a result of a previous stimulus and in some cases a later stimulus, as in metacontrast. See summation.

in·duc·tion

(in-dŭk'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with inducement.
1. Production or causation.
2. The period from the start of anesthetization to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for a surgical procedure.
[L. inductio, a leading in]

Patient discussion about induction

Q. can smoking induce acidity on many ocassions i have felt discomfort similar to when i have acidity, but the problem goes away as soon as i stop smoking for a day or two??

A. I would like to add ther is a condition in respiratory medicine called respiratory acidosis,smoking can cause this state,your lungs can cause this state.Im not sure but this may also be one of your problems.--------mrfoot56

Q. Is it possible for exercise induced asthma patient to exercise? After several times I felt I couldn’t breathe after running and swimming, I was diagnosed with Exercise induced asthma. I tried to resume my regular exercise, but after I developed shortness of breath couple of times I stopped again. Should I attempt exercise again? How can I exercise without having another attack of asthma?

A. People can often prevent symptoms by taking medication prior to exercising. The type of medication used depends on several factors. For example, people with hay fever might take an antihistamine tablet before exercise.

For people with asthma, an inhaler can be used before exercise to prevent asthma problems. Your physician can recommend the best medication for you to use before exercise.

If you have dust mite allergy, you may want to exercise outdoors to avoid breathing indoor dust. If you are allergic to grasses and weeds, you may want to exercise in an indoor location during certain seasons.

Exercising should be avoided in areas where there are large amounts of chemicals. For example, you should not exercise outdoors near heavy traffic areas with high levels exhaust fumes from cars and trucks. Indoor areas with irritating odors or fumes, also, should be avoided.

Q. Does fish-oil helps exercise induced asthma? I was diagnosed with exercise induced asthma a couple of year ago, and since then had better and worse times with my asthma, although the treatment I get. I read in a newspaper that fish oil can help exercise induced asthma- is that true? Do I have to eat fish-oil specifically or can I eat fish instead (I really, really, hate fish-oil…)?

A. I take 6, 1000mg softgels/day. It helps my asthma, arthritis and has lowered my closterol. Started with 10 and worked down to 6, which seems to work best, though sometimes I need the extra.

More discussions about induction
References in periodicals archive ?
The Induction motor market has been segmented based on end users as residential, commercial and industrial.
In summary, the investigators found that, compared to women undergoing expectant management, women undergoing elective induction spent longer duration in L&D units and utilized more resources, but they required significantly fewer antepartum clinic and hospital visits, treatments for hypertensive disorders or chorioamnionitis, and had shorter duration of postpartum length of stay.
Though all the 3 groups of animals fed on 66% fructose diet showed an increase in Mean arterial pressure (MAP) from the baseline within 6 weeks, the induction was not homogeneous among all the groups with maximum rise in standard treatment group [Figure-5].
Castelo noted that the DTI will soon wrap-up its investigation on the use of induction furnace even as she cautioned consumers who are buying construction materials to be vigilant and at least look for the labels on the steel products that they purchase.
There was no difference in the degree of mouth opening or ease of LMA insertion among different groups after induction of anaesthesia.
4,750, Baltra Infrared Induction Cookers "Feel" & "Electro" will be available in the market by June-end.
Inductions heat up almost 50% quicker than electric or gas ranges.
Laudan's list plays a crucial role in the old pessimistic induction. Without it, the old pessimistic induction evaporates, for the premise would merely be an assumption.
It allows the estimation of the induction motor parameters with a reasonably high accuracy.
The Intasite platform is an online video-based induction system, which allows organizations to induct visitors or members of staff remotely.
The novice teachers showed satisfaction over induction program and have certain reservation about infrastructure provided, school culture and the process of managing students.