heat stress detoxification

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heat stress detoxification

An alternative healthcare term for the application of external heat or artificial induction of fever to a patient whose febrile response is viewed as inadequate. External temperature can be increased by saunas, steam baths, local hot compresses and friction, and is claimed to be useful either alone or as an adjunctive therapy in bladder and lung infections, AIDS, cancer and viral infections. While “high-tech hyperthermia” (e.g., diathermy, extracorporal heating, infrared, ultrasound) may have health benefits, there is little peer-reviewed literature supporting its efficacy and use.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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To reach the temperatures necessary to disrupt cancer cell growth, today externally induced hyperthermia procedures are used.
Moros et al., "Application of magnetically induced hyperthermia in the model protozoan Crithidia fasciculata as a potential therapy against parasitic infections," International Journal of Nanomedicine, vol.
Effective January 2017, Pernock will lead all of the company's commercial strategy, execution for its product portfolio as well as the launch of expanded indications for Ryanodex for Exertional Heat Stroke (EHS) and drug induced hyperthermia, if approved by the Food and Drug Administration (UDA), reportind to CEO Scott Tarriff .
Superparamagnetic gel as a novel material for electromagnetically induced hyperthermia. J Magn Magn Mater 2001;225(1-2):109-112.
The authors observed that free doxorubicin and LTSL treatments appeared to deliver more drug in the tumour periphery as compared to the tumour core indicating that HIFU induced hyperthermia and LTSL increases doxorubicin's permeability as doxorubicin was found in both the tumour periphery and core [35].
Table 4 Effect of the violacein and paracetamol in yeast- induced hyperthermia test in rats.
Silica encapsulated manganese perovskite nanoparticles for magnetically induced hyperthermia without the risk of overheating.
The use of anti-pyretics for atropine induced hyperthermia is neither indicated nor effective.
When compared to the control group, fluoxetine, imipramine and SJW (at concentrations of 125 mg/kg, 750 mg/kg and 1000 mg/kg) had no effect on stress induced hyperthermia (SIH).
(94-110) The remainder of this discussion will instead focus on exogenously induced hyperthermia, more specifically, 38.5 to 400 fever-range whole body hyperthermia (FR-WBHT).
Effect of St John's wort on stress induced hyperthermia (SIH)