indolent

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indolent

 [in´do-lent]
1. causing little pain.
2. slow growing.

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lent),
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

(ĭn′də-lənt)
adj.
1.
a. Disinclined to exert oneself; habitually lazy.
b. Conducive to inactivity or laziness; lethargic: humid, indolent weather.
2.
a. Causing little or no pain: an indolent tumor.
b. Slow to heal, grow, or develop; inactive: an indolent ulcer.

in′do·lent·ly adv.

indolent

adjective
Medspeak
Referring to a condition that may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage—e.g., indolent lymphoma, indolent malignancy, indolent myeloma.

Vox populi
Slow growing.

indolent

Medtalk adjective Referring to a condition which may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage, as in an indolent CA Vox populi Slow growing

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lĕnt)
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

Of slow progression or taking a long time to heal. Causing little or no pain. Often used of skin ulcers.
References in periodicals archive ?
A National Guard chief who tried to shake up the army hierarchy, penalised poor discipline and indolence, imposed meritocracy and ignored the requests for favours from the politicians would be sacked in no time.
"We've got great challenges to overcome bureaucracy, corruption and indolence of some officials who turn a blind eye to the problems of the people."
The indolence and irresponsible behaviour of some people may affect the other end, but who cares here!
According to Prof Roe, Keats' famous poems Ode on Indolence and Ode to a Nightingale were inspired while the poet was under the influence of opium.
For Britain, with its belief in individualism and the free market, opiate use was seen both as a threat to physical health, but also ideological health, because it threatened to breed indolence and laziness and was tainted by a connection to "the Orient" (seen as the antithesis of the British way of life).
No wonder the Government sees clamping down on these people as a quick way to garner voter support - no-one wants to help pay for another's indolence.
What has happened since independence has been the fault of murderous tyrants and their cronies and the maddening indolence of the masses of the plain people of Africa.
(1) To this, however, one may in turn respond that, even if such concerns inhabited the spirit of Keats, it is another kind of balance that defines the "justice" of the poem: that which equates the season of mists with that of fruitfulness, and the productive activity of autumn with the indolence of a divinity sitting careless on a granary floor or drowsed with the fume of poppies on a half-reaped furrow.
Burnout is characterized by cognitive deterioration (low enthusiasm towards the job), emotional deterioration (psychological exhaustion), and attitudes and behaviors of indifference and indolence towards clients of the organization.
either at our sleep or their own indolence, and roused
We have a back to front welfare state in this country where dependency, indolence and apathy are rewarded while endeavour, effort and enterprise are scorned.
SHABNAM RAMASWAMY'S jibes at what she calls the Bengali characteristic of indolence are so hilarious that one doesn't recognise the inherent irony.