indolent

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indolent

 [in´do-lent]
1. causing little pain.
2. slow growing.

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lent),
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

/in·do·lent/ (in´dah-lint)
1. causing little pain.
2. slow growing.

indolent

(ĭn′də-lənt)
adj.
1.
a. Disinclined to exert oneself; habitually lazy.
b. Conducive to inactivity or laziness; lethargic: humid, indolent weather.
2.
a. Causing little or no pain: an indolent tumor.
b. Slow to heal, grow, or develop; inactive: an indolent ulcer.

in′do·lent·ly adv.

indolent

[in′dələnt]
Etymology: L, in + dolere, to suffer pain
1 pertaining to an organic disorder that is accompanied by little or no pain.
2 slow to heal or grow, e.g., wounds that heal very slowly.

indolent

adjective
Medspeak
Referring to a condition that may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage—e.g., indolent lymphoma, indolent malignancy, indolent myeloma.

Vox populi
Slow growing.

indolent

Medtalk adjective Referring to a condition which may linger longer, but often slowly progresses to a more advanced stage, as in an indolent CA Vox populi Slow growing

in·do·lent

(in'dō-lĕnt)
Inactive; sluggish; painless or nearly so, said of a morbid process.
[L. in- neg. + doleo, pr. p. dolens (-ent-), to feel pain]

indolent

Of slow progression or taking a long time to heal. Causing little or no pain. Often used of skin ulcers.

indolent

causing little pain; slow growing.

indolent ulcer
see eosinophilic ulcer, refractory ulcer.
References in periodicals archive ?
To this day, Filipinos are still being accused of indolence which we usually ignore, but in the epoch of Generation '96, such invectives were material for sword fights and duels.
A National Guard chief who tried to shake up the army hierarchy, penalised poor discipline and indolence, imposed meritocracy and ignored the requests for favours from the politicians would be sacked in no time.
What has happened since independence has been the fault of murderous tyrants and their cronies and the maddening indolence of the masses of the plain people of Africa.
1) To this, however, one may in turn respond that, even if such concerns inhabited the spirit of Keats, it is another kind of balance that defines the "justice" of the poem: that which equates the season of mists with that of fruitfulness, and the productive activity of autumn with the indolence of a divinity sitting careless on a granary floor or drowsed with the fume of poppies on a half-reaped furrow.
Burnout is characterized by cognitive deterioration (low enthusiasm towards the job), emotional deterioration (psychological exhaustion), and attitudes and behaviors of indifference and indolence towards clients of the organization.
either at our sleep or their own indolence, and roused
Doing so might feel good, if for no other reason than as a robust moral corrective to perceived public-sector indolence (a myth, I would argue).
We have a back to front welfare state in this country where dependency, indolence and apathy are rewarded while endeavour, effort and enterprise are scorned.
SHABNAM RAMASWAMY'S jibes at what she calls the Bengali characteristic of indolence are so hilarious that one doesn't recognise the inherent irony.
That level of indolence makes my misspent youth sound like an Enid Blyton adventure.
Athers and Nas will bridle at the apparent indolence of the ICC.
Across the four turns, the Cologne-based artist will engage themes of indolence, exhaustion, and boredom, deploying sculptural and painterly strategies of cuteness, softness, and bigness and a deadpan humor reminiscent of Claes Oldenburg, Mike Kelley, Andre Cadere, and, of course, Martin Kippenberger.