brainwashing

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brainwashing

 [brān´wahsh-ing]
any systematic effort aimed at instilling certain attitudes and beliefs in persons against their will, usually beliefs in conflict with their prior beliefs and knowledge. It initially referred to political indoctrination of prisoners of war and political prisoners.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

brain·wash·ing

(brān'wash'ing),
Inducing a person to modify attitudes and behavior in certain directions through various forms of psychological pressure or torture.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

brainwashing

(brān′wŏsh′ĭng, -wô′shĭng)
n.
1. Intensive, forcible indoctrination, usually political or religious, aimed at destroying a person's basic convictions and attitudes and replacing them with an alternative set of fixed beliefs.
2. The application of a concentrated means of persuasion, such as an advertising campaign or repeated suggestion, in order to develop a specific belief or motivation.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any mental manipulation intended to change, and ultimately control, the mind of another person, who is held against his/her volition and subjected to psychologic pressure or torture
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

brain·wash·ing

(brān'wawsh'ing)
Inducing a person to modify his attitudes and behavior in certain directions through various forms of psychological pressure or torture.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

brainwashing

Concentrated and sustained indoctrination designed to delete a person's fundamental beliefs and attitudes and replace them with new, imposed data. It is questionable whether this intention can ever be fully realized.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Just as military team building suppresses important aspects of the individual during indoctrination, a parallel system of individual coaching would enhance the transformation process, optimizing the potential of each individual veteran.
"There is a big difference between education and indoctrination," Rep.
Indoctrination, as opposed to education, is commonly understood as inculcating doctrines in authoritative ways that expect the indoctrinated person not to question or critically reflect on the subject or underlying motive of the indoctrinator.
He said he wanted legal action against people who regularly consulted jihadist websites or who travelled abroad for indoctrination and an end to French jails being a breeding ground for extremism.
In the preface of this well referenced book, Tan states that: 'It is interesting to note that the etymological meaning of "indoctrination" simply means "instruction" and indoctrination obtains its opprobrious meaning only from the twentieth century onwards' (p.
The sources claimed that following several months of indoctrination at these centres, youth were generally sent on to more established training camps in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and then on to jihad either in FATA, NWFP, or as suicide bombers in settled areas, said the cable.
He stated that the lawsuit properly alleged a federal constitutional challenge to the use of taxpayer money, in that some money had been used to promote Islamic religious indoctrination. Lawyers for TMLC then compiled voluminous evidence to support its charge.
Javani, a supremacist hardliner, is in charge of indoctrination at both the IRGC and its militia arm, the Basij.
"If the Department provides funding to Corrections Concepts' prison," AU attorneys insisted, "indoctrination will be the inevitable result, just as it was in Prison Fellowship Ministries.
What is certain is that, whatever the cause or consequence, it is an adult problem, not the excuse for political claptrap and indoctrination.
Police have dispersed opponents of Hugo Chavez's government after thousands demonstrated both for and against an education law that critics fear will lead to political indoctrination in schools.
They reasoned that if the indoctrination problem were real, students at the institutions with the most liberal faculties would be more likely to switch their political allegiance from right to left.