individual immunity

individual immunity

[in′divij′o̅o̅·əl]
Etymology: L, individuus, indivisible, immunis, free from
a form of natural immunity not shared by most other members of the race and species. It is rare and probably occurs as the result of an infection that was not recognized when it occurred. Compare racial immunity, species immunity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The foregoing Part described the development of individual immunity determinations and the act of state doctrine--two doctrines that arose out of the law of nations and were, as this Note argues, incorporated into the allocation of foreign relations powers to the political branches.
18 (2010) (noting that the State Department made only six individual immunity determinations out of a total of 110 total decisions rendered from 1952 to 1977).
130 consistent with the court's holding in that case that "an order denying summary judgment based on a claim of individual immunity under section 768.
Here, the immunity provided by the nation-state is weakened and the individual immunity regimes are strengthened.
the degree of individual immunity to which current and former foreign
In some circumstances, the individual immunity will be
They also take part in individual immunity challenges, including swimming in an icy fjord and climbing a frozen waterfall, with the winner being exempt from that week's elimination.
Teachers can determine the incubation time, individual immunity levels and how many characters, called coodles, will start with the infection.
The law applicable to a Bivens claim against a federal official mirrors that applicable to a [sections] 1983 claim for individual immunity purposes, and [sections] 1983 and Bivens immunity cases are interchangeable.
Even outside the FSIA, most individual immunity claims will fall into well-recognized categories of immunity (or lack thereof), and thus present fairly straightforward questions for adjudication.
In Samantar, the Supreme Court held unequivocally that the FSIA does not govern individual immunity claims, but it was much more circumspect about defining the "common law" that does govern such claims.
It is therefore shortsighted to argue, based on the "value orientation" of modern international law, that the progressive reduction of the scope of individual immunity must be accompanied by a similar development with regard to state immunity.

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