individual differences

in·di·vid·u·al dif·fer·enc·es

in clinical psychology, deviations of people from the group average or from each other.
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile, as we have said, whatever individual differences there might be between them all, Miss Crawley's dear nephews and nieces were unanimous in loving her and sending her tokens of affection.
This framework originates in the work of scholars who proposed a narrative model of psychology and individual differences (see McAdams & Pals, 2006), and it has more recently been adapted as a novel framework for individual differences research in the psychology of language learning (Dornyei & Ryan, 2015).
Teaching to Individual Differences in Science and Engineering Librarianship: Adapting Library Instruction to Learning Styles and Personality Characteristics (ISBN: 978-0081018811, 188 pp., $67.11), by Jeanine Mary Williamson, applies learning styles and personality characteristics to science and engineering library instruction.
Already in 2015, the same research group published a meta-study in the journal "Intelligence", in which they identified brain regions - among them the prefrontal cortex - activation changes of which are reliably associated with individual differences in intelligence.
An Introduction to Personality, Individual Differences and Intelligence, 2nd Edition
The study, published online in Personality and Individual Differences, found that individuals with the Dark Triad traits (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism) are more likely to have studied business and economics.
"A major focus of research in cognitive neuroscience is understanding how intelligence is shaped by individual differences in brain structure and function," said study leader Aron K.
Abdullah Yussef Al-Mutawa underlined the need for teachers to take into consideration individual differences between students to ensure success of the educational process.
A study by Kansas State University psychologist Donald Saucier, published in Personality and Individual Differences in May, found that those who believe in pure evil support more harsh criminal punishments.
"I've studied individual differences in color vision for 30 years, and this is one of the biggest individual differences I've ever seen." Jay Neitz, a color-vision researcher at the University of Washington in Seattle, told Wired.

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