indigested


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indigested

(ĭn′dĭ-jĕs′tĭd, -dī-)
adj.
Not digested; undigested: indigested food.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The entire region should keep vigilant and should not allow further spread of the crisis by indigested measures," Araqchi added.
(40) Gary Taylor remarks of the additions that they "reinforced the impression that his lifework was a mess, a collection of 'indigested' plays that mixed genius and ineptitude haphazardly," thus linking the extended canon to the relatively haphazard Restoration treatment of Shakespeare.
In Bion's view, intense negative emotions, including anxiety and sadness elicited in early interaction with the mother and the environment, would be prone to overflow the infant's processing resources and to surface in that indigested form we have earlier referred to as [beta] elements.
complexion from that in which the several crude and indigested parts
The diagnosis he and his enemies share is that the matter of which he was made failed to fully receive its form: he is a 'foul indigested lump.'" William N.
I think they do have little Oedipuses; I think there are bits in the corpus that are unthought through and that are swallowed rather religiously: but possibly the Marxism is the least indigested.
At the forefront of major social changes, of the import and diffusion of Western values, the journalist (and the mass-media institution) had to reinvent his professional identity without having the time for discernment, often relying on a rapid imitation, on indigested and unpracticed systems.
Hashim, "Spirulina Cultivation Indigested Sago Starch Factory Wastewater," J.
Obscuritie in affection of words, & indigested concets, is pedantical and childish; but where it shroudeth it selfe in the hart of his subject, vtterd with witness of figure, and expressiue Epethites; with that darknes wil J still labour to be shadowed.
Johnson offered this definition of "essay": "A loose sally of the mind; an irregular indigested piece; not a regular and orderly composition." I would agree that Nehring's marathon is an essay in that it partakes of the quality of indigestion.
This was not in line with the theological notion that God had endowed Adam with a perfect language, but it conformed to the Scottish 'four stages' theory.(30) Thus the reviewer amended Prichard's pro-Celtic theory in such a manner as to controvert his Biblicist convictions while retaining Sanskrit's historical supremacy: 'The early ancestors of the copiously inflecting Hindoos and musical-tongued Greeks must once have jabbered an indigested interjectionary speech', stated the Eclectic Review, 'the language must have begun from a savage unformed state, and proceeded towards a certain perfection, developing itself in different countries by various methods and with various success.'(31)
It took care to caution its readers -- gainst too hastily adopting `a crude, indigested opinion that this is an Anti-Jacobin Revolution, tending to favour the cause of royalty'.