indicator species


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

indicator species

any species that is indicative of particular conditions or habitats. For example, the leech Erpobdella testacea is found only in alkaline or polluted waters, the arrowworm Sagitta setosa is characteristic of continental shelf water, whereas S. elegans is characteristic of oceanic water.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study of epiphytes in nemoral forests of Latvia, in which more stringent criteria of naturalness and a larger number of stands were used (Mezaka et al., 2008), of the species listed as WKH indicator species (Ek et al., 2002), 12 lichens and 7 bryophytes were recorded, of which respectively 8 and 5 were found on Q.
Table 6 describes the results of the indicator species analysis (ISA).
Managing assemblages by means of indicator species is arguably a small but practical step in the direction of ecosystem-based management (Hall and Mainprize, 2004).
Wetland indicator species did not account for more than 50% of the dominant species, 6 years following construction, at any of the three locations.
It is reclusive, silent, and sedentary, but it's also Mother Nature's natural water filter and an indicator species to boot, and now a small group of scientists in the Southeast is putting in long hours in an attempt to rescue a single imperiled species of mussel.
And their health is a telltale report card on the well-being of planet Earth: that's why frogs are known as an indicator species. As fewer frogs are found, and more malformed ones appear in remaining populations, alarmed scientists can't help but ask: What's in the water?
It's been known for some time the human sperm count is on the decline and, by using alligators as an indicator species, Lou can show why this is the case.
This section should be taken as an encouragement to refine our analyses of indicator species as a means of monitoring the health of ecosystems that are so vital to conservation programs.
Other scientists may disagree, but Lindenmayer and his colleagues argue that despite their intuitive appeal, the use of indicator species in conservation management can be misleading or fail altogether.
Today, scientists consider it an indicator species; its breeding success or failure each year provides a measure of the health of the surrounding ecosystem.
In some studies it has been found that the choice of indicator species had no effect on the results (Gaudet and Keddy 1988).
A panel of scientists has been dispatched to survey the area and decide which parcels of the remaining sage scrub are crucial for the survival of indicator species like the gnatcatcher, the coastal cactus wren, and the orange-throated whiptailed lizard.