incurable

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incurable

 [in-kūr´ah-b'l]
1. not susceptible of being cured.
2. a person with a disease that cannot be cured.

in·cur·a·ble

(in-kyūr'ă-bĕl),
Denoting a disease or morbid process unresponsive to medical or surgical treatment.

incurable

(ĭn-kyo͝or′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Being such that a cure is impossible; not curable: an incurable disease.
2. Incapable of being altered, as in disposition or habits: an incurable optimist; an incurable smoker.

in·cur′a·bil′i·ty n.
in·cur′a·ble n.
in·cur′a·bly adv.

incurable

Not able to be remedied by currently available medical means. The progress of medical science in the 20th century repeatedly showed that what is incurable today is often remediable tomorrow.

Patient discussion about incurable

Q. Cancer - incurable? When i was surfing the internet for the incurable disease, i found CANCER is one among them. Is there not a medicine found yet? Really is it incurable?

A. I like to share with you what i read from a book it said 'With modern day treatments many cancers are completely cured but unfortunately there are still many others which are not.

Although it is not always possible to be certain, doctors are often able to tell whether or not a particular cancer might be cured. Even if cancer is incurable they will usually still offer treatment in the hope of prolonging life and, controlling, symptoms.'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOBvDTf9ohQ

More discussions about incurable
References in periodicals archive ?
The book also confirmed that as his health failed, John Paul prepared a document for aides stating that he would step down instead of ruling for life if he became incurably ill or permanently impaired from carrying out his duties as pope.
Evans notes that Hitler's Operation T-4, his "euthanasia action" program, directed against disabled, mentally ill, and incurably sick Germans, laid the foundation for the more dramatic, Europe-wide extermination programs.
On the contrary, they will rightly see this as a further example of the abdication of the Duty of Care of the Trust and NHS Wales to the incurably mentally ill.
Drawing from Ira Steinman's own vast experience in the field, she seeks to dispel the myth that some people are incurably crazy and must simply be put in a padded room for the rest of their days.
"Norman & The Stinking Space Goo" is Norman's story, as he finds himself incurably toxic in odor, with the only person willing to tolerate his odor and stench is the school's stereotypical science nerd--and find something very interesting that may change both of their lives for good.
After one last failed magical attempt, Thea overhears her parents talking about sending her to the Wandless Academy, the only school in the country for those who cannot perform magic (otherwise known as the Last Ditch School for the Incurably Incompetent, at least to Thea).
As Bishop Elio Sgreccia, president of the Pontifical Academy for Life recently noted, "The doctor should prepare the incurably ill for death by avoiding any 'conspiracy of silence' and proclaiming a life that does not die" (Zenit, Jan.
He might find it hard to believe that any sane person would want to keep the existing building, but it tempts some of us to reply that no-one but an incurably moronic vandal would want to knock it down.
Just half an hour in the box can have huge health benefits and for those, like me, who have an incurably busy life, what is nicer than an excuse to do nothing but to sit in peace and quiet for half an hour?
To feed all people sufficiently, to make sure the curably ill are cured, to tend adequately to the incurably ill, to school and house all well, should be our economics.
6 to decriminalize the interruption of care for incurably ill patients or whose illness is causing too much suffering.
"Congressman, you know what's going on at this conference, and how incurably corrupt and vicious the UN is as an institution," I commented to Rep.