incurable


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incurable

 [in-kūr´ah-b'l]
1. not susceptible of being cured.
2. a person with a disease that cannot be cured.

in·cur·a·ble

(in-kyūr'ă-bĕl),
Denoting a disease or morbid process unresponsive to medical or surgical treatment.

incurable

/in·cur·a·ble/ (in-kūr´ah-b'l)
1. not susceptible of being cured.
2. a person with a disease which cannot be cured.

incurable

(ĭn-kyo͝or′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Being such that a cure is impossible; not curable: an incurable disease.
2. Incapable of being altered, as in disposition or habits: an incurable optimist; an incurable smoker.

in·cur′a·bil′i·ty n.
in·cur′a·ble n.
in·cur′a·bly adv.

incurable

[inkyo̅o̅′rəbəl]
not responding to medical or surgical treatment.

incurable

Not able to be remedied by currently available medical means. The progress of medical science in the 20th century repeatedly showed that what is incurable today is often remediable tomorrow.

incurable

1. not susceptible of being cured.
2. an animal with a disease that cannot be cured.

Patient discussion about incurable

Q. Cancer - incurable? When i was surfing the internet for the incurable disease, i found CANCER is one among them. Is there not a medicine found yet? Really is it incurable?

A. I like to share with you what i read from a book it said 'With modern day treatments many cancers are completely cured but unfortunately there are still many others which are not.

Although it is not always possible to be certain, doctors are often able to tell whether or not a particular cancer might be cured. Even if cancer is incurable they will usually still offer treatment in the hope of prolonging life and, controlling, symptoms.'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOBvDTf9ohQ

More discussions about incurable
References in periodicals archive ?
A further 33% had a nurse who looked after patients both with incurable cancer and those who were newly-diagnosed.
Most (62 percent) see suicide as "a moral right" if someone is in great pain with no hope of improvement: 56 percent say so if someone has an incurable disease; 38 percent say so if "living has become a burden" for the patient; and 32 percent would see suicide as a right if living on is an "extremely heavy burden on his or her family"
BATTLE: Halifax-born Nina Morton-Brook, 52, was told her cancer was incurable in September 2012
MP Somaya Al Jowder, who is former National Incurable Diseases Committee chairperson, said the issue was complex and giving power to courts was the most logical decision.
We should try to keep them as well as we can for as long as we can and not give up just because they have been diagnosed as incurable.
A COMMITTED Christian who was sacked from his council job after suggesting that a woman with an incurable illness "put her faith in God" has lost his legal claim.
Summary: Half of Britons believe those who help a loved one with an incurable illness to die should face prosecution, according to new research.
PARKINSON'S DISEASE NO LONGER INCURABLE--Parkinsonism, or shaking palsy, is no longer a hopeless, progressive, incurable disease.
Currently, ex vivo gene therapy is expanding throughout the world as an effective treatment method for several incurable diseases.
After all the tapes were scrambled and the 40-year-old saliva quietly festered into incurable cold sores, Zero was again declared the winner--a three-peat the likes of which may never occur again.
A Great North Run veteran will be taking part tomorrow to raise money for research to help his 28-year-old daughter, who is suffering from an incurable form of cervical cancer.
It could lead to a cure for a disease we once thought was incurable.