incubator


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incubator

 [in´ku-ba″ter]
an apparatus for maintaining optimal conditions for growth and development, such as temperature and humidity, especially one used in the early care of premature infants, or one used for cultures. The primary purpose of the incubator used for preterm newborns is to surround the infant with some of the environmental conditions normally provided in the uterus and necessary until he reaches approximately the level of development of a full-term infant.

The temperature within the incubator is regulated so that the infant's temperature is maintained between 35.5° and 36.6°C (96° to 98°F). Humidity is kept at 50 to 60 per cent unless there is respiratory difficulty, in which case the humidity may be raised as high as 85 to 100 per cent. Oxygen is added in concentrations not exceeding 30 to 40 per cent only as long as the infant is cyanotic because of the danger of retrolental fibroplasia with high concentrations of oxygen.

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā'tŏr),
1. A container in which controlled environmental conditions may be maintained; for example, for culturing microorganisms.
2. An apparatus for maintaining an infant (usually premature) in an environment of proper oxygenation, humidity, and temperature.

incubator

(ĭn′kyə-bā′tər, ĭng′-)
n.
1. An apparatus in which environmental conditions, such as temperature and humidity, can be controlled, often used for growing bacterial cultures, hatching eggs artificially, or providing suitable conditions for a chemical or biological reaction.
2. Medicine An apparatus for maintaining an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration.

incubator

Neonatology A device that maintains 'enhanced' environmental conditions–↑ humidity, O2, temperature, that optimize the growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā-tŏr)
1. A container in which controlled environmental conditions can be maintained (e.g., for culturing microorganisms).
2. An apparatus for maintaining an infant (usually premature) in an environment of proper oxygenation, humidity, and temperature.

incubator

An equipment providing a closed controllable environment in which optimum conditions may be established for the nutrition, growth and preservation of organisms, whether bacterial or human. Incubators are used to culture bacteria and to promote the survival of premature babies.

in·cu·ba·tor

(in'kyū-bā-tŏr)
A container in which controlled environmental conditions can be maintained (e.g., for culturing microorganisms).
References in periodicals archive ?
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According to her, the hospital, currently has four incubators, which compels officials manning the facility to put two or three pre-term babies in one incubator, a practice she described as not the best.
Abdul Baset Al Janahi, CEO of Mohammed bin Rashid Establishment for SME Development, and Sheikh Khalid Al Qasimi, the entrepreneurs behind the new incubator, attended the opening of the new facility at Downtown Dubai.
Only a few farm incubator programs in the United States have operated for more than 10 years (Overton, 2014).