incubation

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Related to incubations: Incubatory

incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn),
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions for the purpose of favoring growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Maintenance of an artificial environment for an infant, usually a premature or hypoxic one, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. The development, without sign or symptom, of an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

incubation

(ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

incubation

Infectious disease The asymptomatic development of an infection Lab medicine The maintenance of controlled environmental conditions to facilitate growth of microorganisms or cells in culture Neonatology The maintenance of an 'enhanced' environment to optimize growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Maintaining a controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures.
2. Maintaining an artificial environment for an infant, usually one who is premature or hypoxic, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. Developing, without sign or symptom, an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

incubation

  1. the process of brooding or incubating in birds.
  2. the period between infection by a pathogen and appearance of disease symptoms.
  3. the maintenance of microbiological cultures at specific temperatures for a given time.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Incubation

The time period between exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus or bacteria, and the appearance of symptoms of illness.
Mentioned in: Hemorrhagic Fevers
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Development, without sign or symptom, of an infection.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, where patient samples were limited, routine incubation CDC was not performed.
All of these had been processed by the extended incubation CDC protocol.
Taken together, the results indicate that fractional COz laser treatment yields safe and effective clearance of actinic keratoses with "ultra-short" incubation times, Dr.
Major finding: For the 30-minute incubation group, laser plus ALA-PDT cleared 94% of actinic keratoses, compared with 82% for ALA-PDT alone.
The results showed gradual increase in bacterial population with increase in mancozeb concentration up to 250 ppm at all the incubation period studied.
The effect of incubation period revealed significant increase in average N[O.sub.3.sup.-]-N after one week of incubation.
Incubation 5 measures the pyruvate oxidation rate in the presence of atractyloside.
Incubation 6 measures the TCA cycle activity except for SDH and fumarase.
By slowing the reactions using a cooler incubation temperature (25[degrees]C), we were also able to identify the intermediates.
Ammonium concentrations in soil extracts increased in a linear fashion, with day 8 values higher (close to 74 [micro]g N/g dry soil with or without added nitrate) in incubations under saturated conditions than those remaining unsaturated (53 [micro]g N/g dry soil with and 46 [micro]g N/g dry soil without added nitrate).
DON concentrations in soil extracts increased over time in incubations with and without nitrate addition under saturated and unsaturated conditions.
Keywords: Alectoris rufa; Red-legged partridge; Pre-storage incubation; Long-term storage; Hatchability.