incubation


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incubation

 [in″ku-ba´shun]
1. the provision of proper conditions for growth and development, as for bacterial or tissue cultures.
2. the development of an infectious disease from time of the entrance of the pathogen to the appearance of clinical symptoms.
3. the development of the embryo in the egg of oviparous animals.
4. the maintenance of an artificial environment for a newborn, especially a premature infant.
incubation period the interval of time required for development; especially the time between invasion of the body by a pathogenic organism and appearance of the first symptoms of disease. Incubation periods vary from a few days to several months, depending on the causative organism and type of disease.

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn),
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions for the purpose of favoring growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Maintenance of an artificial environment for an infant, usually a premature or hypoxic one, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. The development, without sign or symptom, of an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]

incubation

(ĭn′kyə-bā′shən, ĭng′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of incubating.
b. The state of being incubated.
2. Medicine The development of an infection from the time the pathogen enters the body until signs or symptoms first appear.
3. Medicine The maintenance of an infant, especially a premature infant, in an environment of controlled temperature, humidity, and oxygen concentration in order to provide optimal conditions for growth and development.

in′cu·ba′tion·al adj.

incubation

Infectious disease The asymptomatic development of an infection Lab medicine The maintenance of controlled environmental conditions to facilitate growth of microorganisms or cells in culture Neonatology The maintenance of an 'enhanced' environment to optimize growth of a premature or otherwise compromised infant

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Maintaining a controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures.
2. Maintaining an artificial environment for an infant, usually one who is premature or hypoxic, by providing proper temperature, humidity, and, usually, oxygen.
3. Developing, without sign or symptom, an infection from the time the infectious agent gains entry until the appearance of the first signs or symptoms.
[L. incubo, to lie on]

incubation

  1. the process of brooding or incubating in birds.
  2. the period between infection by a pathogen and appearance of disease symptoms.
  3. the maintenance of microbiological cultures at specific temperatures for a given time.

Incubation

The time period between exposure to an infectious agent, such as a virus or bacteria, and the appearance of symptoms of illness.
Mentioned in: Hemorrhagic Fevers

in·cu·ba·tion

(in'kyū-bā'shŭn)
1. Act of maintaining controlled environmental conditions to favor growth or development of microbial or tissue cultures or to maintain optimal conditions for a chemical or immunologic reaction.
2. Development, without sign or symptom, of an infection.
[L. incubo, to lie on]
References in periodicals archive ?
Under this partnership with NUML, we will be offering incubation management training to universities, colleges, and madrasas staff on how to help students with their startups and how to manage a financially sustainable incubation programme.
On the benefits of the incubation programme, Fahad Abdulrahim Kazim, VP of Meydan Malls, said: "Dubai is spearheading the region's innovation drive and attracting some of the best start-up talent from around the world.
The Centres offer talented entrepreneurs and promising start-ups of quality incubation programmes, access to mentor and investor networks as well as technical resources.
During incubation, exposing eggs to light can increase the embryo's growth (Shafey, 2004) and decrease time of incubation (Fairchild and Christensen, 2000).
The state of art National Incubation Centre, Peshawar is located at PTCL training centre, Jamrud Road.
All samples were processed for donor recipient crossmatch using routine incubation CDC, extended incubation CDC and antihuman globulin CDC.
EIP is the time taken for incubation of the virus in the mosquito.
His account of Greco-Roman Egypt led him back to Pharaonic Egypt as well, and his search for possible origins of Greek incubation required him to examine the phenomenon among the Sumerians, Babylonians, Hittites, and other people of the ancient Near East.
The Innovation promotion for generation of new ideas involves a three pronged strategy of setting up of Atal Tinkering Labs (ATLs) at School level, Atal Incubation Centres (AICs) at higher education institutions & R&D Laboratories etc and Scale up support to established incubation centres (EICs)
This approach reduced the incubation time of aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to 20 minutes, with comparable results to 1-hour ALA incubation times.
ALP is a heat labile enzyme and specific ALP isoenzymes have different sensitivity to heat inactivation, so ALP activity measurement at different incubation period will affect the actual measurement as and creates lab to lab variability and significant change if particular isoenzyme is predominant in patient sera.
This rapid expansion highlighted key knowledge gaps, including incubation period.