inconsolable

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inconsolable

(ĭn″kŏn-sō′lŏ-bĭl) [L. inconsolabilis]
Said of an infant or child who is extremely irritable and cannot be comforted despite its parents' best efforts. In pediatrics inconsolability is a clinical indicator of severe illness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Logistic regression analysis, adjusted for socioeconomic factors, revealed that mothers with postpartum depressive symptoms were 2.59 times more likely to report infant inconsolability than were mothers who did not report postpartum depressive symptoms.
Brave Orchid's understandable wish for everyone to move back home is infused with the metaphorics of hunger, with "inconsolability" the emotional equivalent of insatiability.
Presence of red flag symptoms should raise early suspicion * Lethargy and listlessness (intussusception, obstructed inguinal hernia) * Inconsolability (obstructed inguinal hernia, torsion of testis) * Severe abdominal pain or distension (malrotation, intussusception) * Persistent vomiting (pyloric stenosis) * Bile-stained vomit (green) (malrotation, intussusception) * Projectile vomiting (pyloric stenosis) * High fever (appendicitis, mastoiditis) * Blood in the vomit * Abnormal discolouration of skin over lumps and bumps (obstructed inguinal hernia, mastoiditis) * Blood in stool (intussusception) Common surgical presentations in children
Sedation with midazolam can also result in unwanted behavioral side effects such as physical aggression and inconsolability, which are stressful for the patient, parent, and staff (Elder & Longenecker, 1995).
Pieces of a whole are not viewed as desirable in "Les Tentations," where broken chains--perhaps the halos of other fallen poets (6) -- only entangle the feet of the demon and contribute to his apparent inconsolability. Leaving the snake intact may be read then as leaving the narration vulnerable yet intact, as allowing some form of plot to unfold, at least within the collection's individual poems.
Although 161 of the 167 infants who met clinical criteria for a UTI were urine tested on their first visit, demographic predictors of UTIs most commonly used to decide whether to test--younger age, inconsolability, initial ill appearance, and lack of another apparent fever source--were not predictors of UTIs.
Newborn/ Infant indicators may include: irritability, agitated, inconsolability, non responsive to auditory, visual or tactile stimuli.
He had been back to the pediatrician three times for extreme irritability, inconsolability, and recurrent vomiting episodes occurring after his feedings.