incompatible

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incompatible

 [in″kom-pat´ĭ-b'l]
not suitable for combination, simultaneous administration, or transplantation; mutually repellent.

in·com·pat·i·ble

(in'kom-pat'i-bĕl),
1. Not of suitable composition to be combined or mixed with another agent or substance, without resulting in an undesirable reaction (including chemical alteration or destruction or pharmacologic effect).
2. Denoting those who are unable to associate with one another without resulting anxiety and conflict.
3. Having genotypes that put progeny at high risk of severe recessive disorders or that promote harmful maternal-fetal reaction (for example, erythroblastosis fetalis is Rh incompatible).
4. Having antigenic nonidentity between a donor and a recipient.
[L. in- neg., + con-, with, + patior, pp. passus, to suffer, tolerate]

incompatible

(ĭn′kəm-păt′ə-bəl)
adj.
Medicine
a. Producing an undesirable effect when used in combination with a particular substance: a medication that is incompatible with alcohol.
b. Not immunologically compatible: incompatible blood types.

in′com·pat′i·ble·ness n.
in′com·pat′i·bly adv.

in·com·pat·i·ble

(in'kŏm-pat'i-bĕl)
1. Not suitable to be combined or mixed with another substance.
2. Denoting people who are unable to associate with one another without anxiety and conflict.
3. Having genotypes that put progeny at high risk of severe recessive disorders or that promote harmful maternal-fetal reaction.
4. Denoting people who are unable to enter into a donor-recipient medical relationship.

in·com·pat·i·ble

(in-'kŏm-pat'i-bĕl)
Not of suitable composition to be combined or mixed with another agent or substance, without resulting in an undesirable reaction (including chemical alteration or pharmacologic effect).
[L. in- neg., + con-, with, + patior, pp. passus, to suffer, tolerate]
References in periodicals archive ?
To the extent that priorities were reactively set, often unpredictably and incompatibly with public planning, planners can be alerted to the dangers of simplistic solutions.
As the financial markets developed and as a national "market for corporate control" emerged in the 1960s, however, state (trust) and federal (contract) standards overlapped, sometimes incompatibly. For a growing number of social scientists and lawyers, marketing-enhancing roles promised to liberate shareholders from their dependency and to render the trustee approach an anachoronism.
Jobs may be incompatibly designed, given the existing skills of employees, or they may be inappropriately meshed.
In the report, the authors acknowledge the incompatibly of Syria's desire to have returned "all territory lost to Israel in June 1967," and Israel's desire to not return said territory.
The method's basic premise is that the domains operate independently and sometimes incompatibly. (28) After all, the law on targeting and detention is compartmentalized, and outcomes across domains typically do vary.
For, if A has a right, B has an obligation to recognize it, and not act incompatibly with it.
But the show's nutty core comes with an incompatibly gooey center--and a leading man who persists in talking directly to the camera like he's doing an infomercial, even when at home with his kid.
Although the retention of parliamentary sovereignty under the Victorian Charter (and the Human Rights' Act 1998 (UK) c 42) permits Parliament to legislate incompatibly with rights, there are political constraints on power: 'the principle of legality means that Parliament must squarely confront what it is doing and accept the political cost.' (107) Secondly, it reinforces the justificatory aspects of the Victorian Charter.
acts incompatibly. (21) Here, the President appears to be at the nadir
Beryllium is best enriched in magmas through the process of fractional crystallization whereby Be behaves incompatibly, is not taken up in a crystallizing mineral phase, and is thereby enriched in the residual melt fraction.
This two-part proposal consists of a recommendation and a directive to rectify current EC practices that allow national paging systems to vary widely and incompatibly. The recommendation calls for the creation of a standardized digital paging system called the European Radio Messaging System (ERMES).
In Part III I explore two areas--Hanushek and Lindseth's substantive school reform proposals and Rebell's institutional choice and process arguments--in which the authors appear to be talking past each other, though not incompatibly.