income

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income

financial return from a project or for help provided.

income elasticity
see demand elasticity.
net income
gross income less costs.
income over feed cost
a rough indicator of the profitability of an animal enterprise based principally on fattening of young livestock, e.g. in a feedlot. The fixed costs are the depreciation on the installation and labor, the variable costs are the price of cattle and the feed.
References in classic literature ?
The knowledge of Sir Percival's affairs which I had necessarily gained when the provisions of the deed on HIS side were submitted in due course to my examination, had but too plainly informed me that the debts on his estate were enormous, and that his income, though nominally a large one, was virtually, for a man in his position, next to nothing.
As to that, my sweet Catherine, there cannot be a doubt, and you know me well enough to be sure that a much smaller income would satisfy me.
Think of Annabella, think of the family, think of the fifty pounds--an income, a year's income to a prudent man.
He is a millionaire -- his income is 500,000 francs.
One of the most agreeable possible, my dear sir; he will allow you an income of 50,000 livres per annum during the whole time of your stay in Paris.
As to your rank, an annual income of 50,000 livres will enable you to support it admirably.
Am I to consider this as part of my income on account?
She lives in reputation at the polite end of the town, and is so good an economist, that she spends three times the income of her fortune, without running into debt.
Reported median incomes vary by geographic region, as shown in Figure 2.
As incomes change, economic conditions improve, and social security programs rise, and the median also rises.
As Christopher Sarlo has pointed out, they include post-secondary students who live independently during the school year and whose loans and gifts do not count as income; senior citizens who own their homes mortgage-free and are supplementing low incomes with savings; people in transition (first-time workers, immigrants, the divorced and widowed, released prisoners, etc.
The new law established a two-rate system of 3 percent (for incomes over $600) and 5 percent (for incomes over $10,000), as well as taxes on inheritances, corporations, and various commodities.