incisive

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incisive

 [in-si´siv]
1. having the power of cutting; sharp.
2. pertaining to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv),
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

incisive

/in·ci·sive/ (-si´siv)
1. having the power or quality of cutting.
2. pertaining to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Relating to the incisor teeth.
2. Cutting; having the power to cut.

incisive

1. having the power of cutting; sharp.
2. pertaining to the incisor teeth.

incisive bone
the bone bearing the incisors. Called also premaxilla. See Table 10.
References in periodicals archive ?
The reviewer especially recommends chapters 6 and 7, "Wilson, the Republicans, and French Security after World War I" and "The United States and the Weimar Republic," for their logic and incisiveness as well as chapter 1 ("Wilson and the Culture of Wilsonianism"), which is probably as revealing of Wilson's thought processes and of his approach to foreign policy as any short essay ever written.
Written in a fairly measured way, the individual articles within this book manage to combine the necessary attributes of interest, readability, thought provocation and incisiveness into a great little 328-page paperback.
A clear love of Iran and its hospitable people, despite the country's ubiquitous "Death to America" mantra, shines through in Ward's writing, but the book lacks the incisiveness of two other traveler-in-Iran books this reviewer has reviewed for KLIATT.
Yet what stands out in the end is the rigor and incisiveness of his analysis--the provocative conclusions he derives from his vignettes and the remarkable way that he is able to make us see their larger significance.
Immersed in structuralism and theory, she applies the same incisiveness to critical problems as she has to those of narrative.
Soviet dictator Vladimir] Lenin was a man with a mind of great clarity and incisiveness and his ideas have had a profound influence on the course of contemporary history.
It's no coincidence that the motive force of Ruskin's prose was the King James Bible, and that the biblical English currently available to Lerner [biblical Hebrew being largely unavailable to his readers) is a language purged of earthiness, wordplay, grandeur, and incisiveness.
Harcourt, with an incisiveness one has to admire, cuts through the rhetoric of rights and forces us to confront the reality of rights: they do not exist but are made to exist, before they can be experienced they must be won; if they are to endure they must be shared.
In Robin Cook, Mr Blair has a Foreign Secretary whose incisiveness and grasp of detail will be essential in complex negotiations over Europe.
Morrissey seeks systematically to analyze and place in context one of the most incisive and learned of these approaches, that of Eric Voegelin, whose monumental learning and incisiveness in practically all disciplines including theology is well known and much appreciated.
The reader stays interested because of Pemberton's wit, incisiveness, and originality.