incisive

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incisive

 [in-si´siv]
1. having the power of cutting; sharp.
2. pertaining to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv),
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Relating to the incisor teeth.
2. Cutting; having the power to cut.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this feeling applies to The Muslims of Medieval Italy at certain points, Metcalfe distinguishes his book with his analytic incisiveness. This incisiveness can be seen by comparing the differences in the discussions found in U.
Masen's influential Speculum imaginum defines the emblem as a word-image construct displaying argutia (incisiveness), a quality distilled by the laconic eloquence of Seneca, Statius, and Martial.
It is an excellent 'Forschungsbericht', written with incisiveness, occasional wit, and impartiality.
Yes, he acted with the speed and incisiveness of an obese mollusc when it was revealed that our Government had been allowing foreign-born criminals out of our jails without even a thought of deporting them.
Clicking on the headline brings that column to life, ready to be enjoyed and valued again for the incisiveness of the insight that it brought when it first appeared in the pages of T&P.
"Stanley brought to class all that incredible incisiveness, brilliance, speed, and energy from Balanchine," says Villella.
That's pretty heady company, and if I hold special places for the finesse of Gilels, the poetry of Kovacevich, and the incisiveness of Cliburn, I'd have to remind you of the price of this Richter reissue, with its 1988 coupling of the Piano Sonata, and it looks pretty good.
The reviewer especially recommends chapters 6 and 7, "Wilson, the Republicans, and French Security after World War I" and "The United States and the Weimar Republic," for their logic and incisiveness as well as chapter 1 ("Wilson and the Culture of Wilsonianism"), which is probably as revealing of Wilson's thought processes and of his approach to foreign policy as any short essay ever written.
Written in a fairly measured way, the individual articles within this book manage to combine the necessary attributes of interest, readability, thought provocation and incisiveness into a great little 328-page paperback.
A clear love of Iran and its hospitable people, despite the country's ubiquitous "Death to America" mantra, shines through in Ward's writing, but the book lacks the incisiveness of two other traveler-in-Iran books this reviewer has reviewed for KLIATT.
Yet what stands out in the end is the rigor and incisiveness of his analysis--the provocative conclusions he derives from his vignettes and the remarkable way that he is able to make us see their larger significance.
Immersed in structuralism and theory, she applies the same incisiveness to critical problems as she has to those of narrative.