incisive

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Related to incisively: indescribably, bewildering

incisive

 [in-si´siv]
1. having the power of cutting; sharp.
2. pertaining to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv),
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Cutting; having the power to cut.
2. Relating to the incisor teeth.

in·ci·sive

(in-sī'siv)
1. Relating to the incisor teeth.
2. Cutting; having the power to cut.
References in periodicals archive ?
Elsewhere, the RLPO brass also distinguished themselves: the horns providing a wonderfully cohesive dawn-to-dusk rising and falling refrain arching through Danish composer Carl Nielsen''s homage to Greek sun god Helios, and later, the full ensemble incisively topping out the rolling chorale-like finale to Sibelius''s popular Second Symphony.
In Booklist, reviewer Donna Seaman wrote, "In her first from scratch investigative book since 'The Orchid Thief' (1999), New Yorker staff writer Orlean incisively chronicles every facet of the never-before-told, surprisingly consequential, and roller coaster-like Rin Tin Tin saga, including the rapid evolution of the film and television industries, the rise of American pet culture, how Americans heeded the military's call and sent their dogs into combat during World War II, and even what the courageous canine meant to her own family."
John O'Malley summarizes the debates at Vatican II incisively and compares them eruditely with those of previous church councils from 325 to 1870.
He wrote well and incisively for the GDN on social issues.
The veteran former skipper believes that he still has plenty to offer England and his ability to retain possession and pass incisively was sorely missed at the finals.
Even with the enviable clarity that makes this book accessible to a general audience, J.'s work is so incisively argued and comprehensive in its treatment of recent constructive theology that it ought to be required reading in any graduate class in soteriology.
Lord Mandelson, in his interview with the Sunday Mirror, incisively identifies the Cameron problem.
The article by Barry Irving incisively calls upon us to question our assumptions, the foundations upon which we construct the profession and intentions for social justice through education.
Rather than, say, focusing narrowly on the details of contemporary Anglo-American liberal theory, as do responses to John Rawls's concept of "public reason" (which demands of all participants in a liberal polity that they offer their colleagues reasons in principle accessible to everyone and hence independent of particular faith commitments), Baker ranges widely along the horizon, incisively characterizing and commenting on these arguments and many others.
"This kind of behaviour cannot be tolerated in a professional, elite sporting environment and we have acted quickly and incisively in order to leave no ambiguity over the dim view we take of this situation."
Exemplifying a set of practical-cum-theoretical tendencies--the two are now inextricably linked, which is part of the story--without forcing them into an infelicitous ism, Singer incisively grouped twenty-two New York-based artists whose works, per the press release, exhibit "diverging conceptual approaches to abstract painting and question the fundamental roots of the medium's modernist legacies." Thus did Richard Aldrich, Polly Apfelbaum, Kerstin Bratsch, Ana Cardoso, Jessica Dickinson, Cheryl Donegan, Keltie Ferris, Wade Guyton, Jaya Howey, Alex Hubbard, Jacqueline Humphries, Jacob Kassay, Jutta Koether, Nate Lowman, Seth Price, R.