incise

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in·cise

(in-sīz'),
To cut with a knife.

in·cise

(in-sīz')
To cut with a knife.

incise

(ĭn-sīz′) [L. incisus]
To cut, as with a sharp instrument.
References in periodicals archive ?
The surface color of the wood changes (surface charring) during laser incising. Because teak and mahogany lumber are preferred owing to their appearance, the incision holes must be filled and the surface charring covered with a suitable material, such as wood filler, in order to maintain the appearance of the lumber products.
Sanding the leaves improved smoothness, thereby making for easier incising, but it also made the entire leaf surface more receptive to ink, thereby creating problems in wiping.
Seven species were tested with and without incising; four species not normally incised commercially were not tested with incising (Table 1).
For example, incising is demonstrated with Styrofoam and a dull pencil.
Protocol for incising the plies of this study followed that of a previous study by the authors (Piao et al.
kiln, a softball sized chunk of clay cloth, rolling pin or dowel, lattice strips, cloth, clay knife and incising tools, bathroom tissue cardboard tube, acrylic paints small wood pieces for bases, glue, paper towels
Prior to the binding process, the surfaces of the plies used to construct the laminated crossarms were treated by one of two surface preparation methods (priming or incising) or were left untreated.
The three surface preparations (control, incising, priming) were randomly assigned to the three clusters, with all groups within the same cluster receiving the same surface preparation.
Two surface treatment methods (priming and incising) were evaluated for their efficacy in improving the bonding performance of decommissioned utility pole wood and untreated virgin wood.
Incising the lumber substantially improves treatment (Morris 1991) and may be expected to do the same for plywood.
In this study, aspen, yellow birch, and sugar maple samples were treated with four different fungi for 2, 4, and 8 weeks, for biological incising to improve wood permeability.