incidence

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incidence

 [in´sĭ-dens]
the rate at which a certain event occurs, as the number of new cases of a specific disease occurring during a certain period in a population at risk, in contrast to prevalence.

in·ci·dence

(in'si-dens), Do not confuse this word with prevalence.
1. The number of specified new events, for example, people falling ill with a specified disease, during a specified period in a specified population.
2. In optics, intersection of a ray of light with a surface.
[L. incido, to fall into or upon, to happen]

incidence

/in·ci·dence/ (-sid-ins) the rate at which a certain event occurs, as the number of new cases of a specific disease occurring during a certain period in a population at risk.

incidence

[in′sidəns]
Etymology: L, incidere, to happen
1 the number of times an event occurs.
2 (in epidemiology) the number of new cases in a particular period. Incidence is often expressed as a ratio, in which the number of cases is the numerator and the population at risk is the denominator. See also rate.

incidence

Epidemiology 
1. The number of new cases–in the form of a count or rate of a disease or condition, often an infection diagnosed each yr–classically measured as an attack rate.
2. The rate of occurrence of new cases of a disease or condition in a population at risk during a given period of time, usually 1 yr.

in·ci·dence

(in'si-dĕns)
1. The number of specified new events, e.g., people falling ill with a specified disease, during a specified period in a specified population.
2. optics Intersection of a ray of light with a surface.

incidence

The number of cases of an event, such as a disease, occurring in a particular population during a given period. Incidence is usually expressed as so many cases per 1000, or per 100,000, per year. Compare PREVALENCE.

incidence

number of new disease cases, within a defined population, within a specific time period (contrast with prevalence)

incidence

1. The intersection of a ray of light with an optical surface. 2. The number of new cases of a specific disease or condition occurring during a specific period of time (e.g. 1 year) divided by the population at risk during that period. Example: the incidence of keratoconus in Olmsted County, Minnesota was found to be 2 cases per 100 000 population a year. See prevalence.

in·ci·dence

(in'si-dĕns) Do not confuse this word with prevalence.
Number of specified new events, during a specified period in a specified population.

incidence (in´sidəns),

n 1. the number of times an event occurs.
2. the number of new cases in a particular period. Incidence is often expressed as a ratio, in which the number of cases is the numerator and the population at risk is the denominator.

incidence

the rate at which a certain event occurs, as the number of new cases of a specific disease occurring during a certain period.

incidence reporting schemes
prospective gathering of epidemiological data on incidence of nominated diseases.

Patient discussion about incidence

Q. Is it possible to get ADHD from suffering a traumatizing incident? lately, after the death of my Grandmother. I have been increasingly getting the symptoms of ADHD. I have suffered from some of the symptoms during my childhood, but now they are increasingly occurring. And I am finding it really hard to listen to Teachers, follow instructions and do coursework. Is it possible this was caused by the death of my grandmother?

A. I think you should look up depression. ADHD is something that does not “pop”, more reasonable to think is that you suffer from a slight depression. Check it out and see if it fits :
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/depression.html

Q. Is the incidence of breast cancer growing everyday? I have a small lump in my breast. My friends suggested me to have a regular mammogram as a precautionary step. My friend’s family women are having it yearly. But I am confused…Why is the need to go for mammogram without any problem. I think routine medical check-up is sufficient. Is the incidence of breast cancer growing everyday?

A. NO….its not increasing. I had my breast cancer found in early stages, 6 month back. I was lucky. You know why—I had my mammogram done just by fear of having it in future. In order to avoid any I did and was very lucky as it was found and soon cured. Most female take it as precaution and you should too. Apart from mammogram you must have clinical breast examination.

More discussions about incidence
References in periodicals archive ?
Northern Samar posted the highest poverty incidence among population in the first semester of 2015 with 61.
Caption: Estimated melanoma incidence by state, 2015
This compared with a 33% incidence of migraine headache in control subjects.
In this study, our primary objective was to evaluate the impact of interventions on reducing the incidence of colonization with or infection caused by antimicrobial drug-resistant pathogens or CDAD.
There had been speculation that these findings might be explained by viruses; however, the working group found little evidence that these occupations have a higher incidence of viral infections or that viruses have a causal role in myeloid leukemia.
Cancers of the colon and rectum began to decrease in the mid-1980s, and their incidence remained steady between 1995 and 1998.
The incidence of generic quality screen (GQS) failures remained constant for physicians before and after joining large group practices.
The study met its primary endpoint of demonstrating a significant reduction in the incidence of painful ISRs with B2000 administration compared to the standard needle-syringe (36 percent for the device vs.
This analysis also showed that patients in the verapamil and trandolapril arm had significantly lower incidences of new diabetes or death, and lower rates of new diabetes or a cardiovascular event, compared with those treated with atenolol plus hydrochlorothiazide.
To evaluate the relationship between El Nino and VL and to quantify the delay of its possible impact, we calculated the cross-correlation function between the annual incidences of VL per 10,000 inhabitants from 1985 to 1999 and the 12-month moving average of the mean monthly Nino-3 index.