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incest

 [in´sest]
sexual activity between persons so closely related that marriage between them is legally or culturally prohibited.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·cest

(in'sest),
1. Sexual relations between people closely related by blood, especially between parent and child, brother and sister.
2. The crime of sexual relations between persons related by blood, where such cohabitation is prohibited by law.
[L. incestus, unchaste, fr. in-, not, + castus, chaste]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

incest

Vox populi Sexual intercourse among close kin–eg, brother/sister, parent/offspring, first cousins, based on genealogic or totemic descent, or by reason of marriage or adoption; incest is illegal in most societies. See Conguinity.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·cest

(in'sest)
1. Sexual relations between people closely related by blood, especially between parents and their children, and between sibs.
2. The crime of sexual relations between people related by blood, where such cohabitation is prohibited by law.
[L. incestus, unchaste, fr. in-, not, + castus, chaste]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

incest

Sexual intercourse between close blood relatives, especially between brothers and sisters, fathers and daughters, or mothers and sons. The ‘prohibited degrees’ vary in extent in different legal systems. There is a strong social taboo against incest now thought to be based on social and psychological, rather than genetic, factors.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The theme of the incest was very popular in medieval fiction, from hagiography to romance.
Stories of father and daughter incest are, instead, common in romance fiction.
There are also major romance heroes associated with stories of incest: from the early thirteenth century, some legends of King Arthur include his incestuous relation with his unknown half-sister Morgause of Orkney, whose son Mordred is destined to destroy his father.
The popularity of the theme of incest in Western Europe from the twelfth century on is undeniable, and although it is undoubtedly difficult to ascribe such popularity to the actual incidence of incest in medieval society, it indeed reflects a deep social concern.
In fact, aristocratic marriage had the main goal of protecting the patrimony, and for this purpose it encouraged endogamy to keep inheritance in the same house (although nuclear incest was not practiced, the notion of incest lost its meaning beyond the third degree of kinship), allowed male adultery as long as no inheritance was involved (female adultery was prohibited to avoid another man's blood to have claim on the family patrimony) and did not require strict monogamy, since a widower could remarry or a husband could repudiate a wife not only on the ground of her adultery but also in the interest of the patrimony.
Georges Duby focuses on some concrete cases of incest, bigamy and divorce fought by the Church.
In all the above mentioned cases the separations were ratified as perfectly legal because of incest, by the same Church which also consecrated the marriages.