pyromania

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pyromania

 [pi″ro-ma´ne-ah]
an impulse control disorder consisting of a compulsion to set fires or watch fires, in the absence of monetary or other material gain to the person. The pyromaniac gets intense pleasure and emotional relief from these activities.

py·ro·ma·ni·a

(pī'rō-mā'nē-ă),
A morbid impulse to set fires.
Synonym(s): incendiarism
[pyro- + G. mania, frenzy]
A disorder of impulse control which is characterised by a pattern of fire setting for pleasure, gratification, or relief of tension

pyromania

Psychiatry  A disorder of impulse control which is characterized by a pattern of fire setting for pleasure, gratification, or relief of tension. See Impulse control disorder.
Pyromania–diagnostic criteria
Diagnostic criteria
(1) The person has set fires deliberately and on purpose on more than 1 occasion (multiple episodes involved)
(2) The person feels a tension or affective arousal before setting the fire
(3) Fascination, interest, attraction and/or curiosity for fire making paraphernalia, fire fighting equipment or any fire-related topic
(4) Pleasure, gratification, or relief may be felt
(a) when setting fires
(b) while witnessing a fire
(c) when participating in the aftermath
Exclusion criteria  
The fire setting cannot be better explained by another disorder (mania, antisocial personality conduct disorder, other).
The fire setting is not done (1) for monetary gain–insurance etc (2) to express a sociopolitical ideology, (3) to conceal a criminal act, (4) as a conscious expression of anger or vengeance, (5) to improve one's living circumstances, (6) in response to a delusion or hallucination, and (7) as a result of impaired judgement due to delusion or intoxication.

py·ro·ma·ni·a

(pī'rō-mā'nē-ă)
A morbid impulse to set fires.
[pyro- + G. mania, frenzy]

pyromania

A compulsion to start fires.

Pyromania

An impulse control disorder in which one sets fires.
References in periodicals archive ?
The MEC was committed to extirpating slavery, its position all the more assertive since the Buffalo General Conference of May 1860, controlled by "rampant Abolitionism," had altered the chapter on slavery to declare the institution "contrary to the laws of God and nature." The church had become the ecclesiastical arm of William Seward and the Black Republicans: Bewley and all agents of the MEC operating in the slave states were their "advance guard." According to the New Orleans Christian Advocate, conspiracy was the natural "fruit of the doctrine taught by the entire Northern Methodist press" of Edward Thomson, Calvin Kingsley, Erastus Haven, and Charles Elliott; "freedom of speech" was one thing, Methodist incendiarism another.
Both the court proceedings and the incendiarism that illuminated the night skies of Tsolo and Qumbu were elaborate theaters, perhaps more accurately newly invented rituals, that concerned authority and community, purity and pollution, cattle sacrifice and morality, mendacity and masculinity, the night battles of men and their magic.
In Balasi location, for example, a ranger's huts "were completely destroyed." The incendiarism had a powerful impact on the ranger who received a cash wage from the state, collected written statistical data on livestock holding, and enforced betterment.
Evidence of incendiarism, as developed and identified by the expert investigator, generally includes one or more of the following:
But the court was also referred to an authority on insurance law which stated: "If the assured is so insane as not to be legally responsible for his acts, an act of incendiarism will not prevent him from recovering under the policy.
For example, Moncrieff's one act, Reform; Or, John Bull Triumphant: A Patriotic Drama (1828, Royal Coburg), similarly allows reformist and patrician viewpoints to contest with each other, even as the play touches on agricultural distress and incendiarism. If Douglas Jerrold's Mutiny at ...
Perceived by reactionaries as no more than "a gang of Ruffians," the audiences were the manifestations of a rising literate underclass already volubly deploying its own press.(12) Addressing its own public sphere, for example, A Monitory Letter To The People Of England (motto: "Popular Rights / the voice of the People") typically editorialized an agrarianist stance against the misappropriation of "super abundant subsistence" whilst reporting Kentish agricultural incendiarism alongside advertisements for cheap editions of P.
The US experience in Korea, say the authors, "reveals a military culture that allowed an army to resort to scorched-earth tactics, to incendiarism [in 1952 US forces were using an average of 70,000 gallons of napalm daily], to a strategy of total warfare within the confines of Korea, even to the condoning of war crimes." Indeed, their book shows in alarming detail how the United States was doggedly developing an array of biological weapons for offensive purposes at a time when the public was being told the arsenal was purely defensive.
As the authorities become more skilled in their handling of popular political action, so too the dialogue between state and people moderated passion and cooled potential incendiarism.
Incendiarism, Animal Maiming and Poaching in East Anglia 1815-1870 (Oxford University Press, 1990) shows how in the years of 'prosperity and high farming' social conflict remained central in the countryside.
In this area, incendiarism is the cause of about half the forest fires, and a rash of fires is expected as winter weather dries out the fuels.