incapacitate

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incapacitate

(ĭn″kă-păs′ĭ-tāt)
Being made incapable of some function, act or strength. This may be purely physical or intellectual or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an illustration of strategic incapacitation, the application of these models with the SITKA investigation raise significant questions about the role of risk assessments, the integration of widespread surveillance and data-banking, and the continuity of crowd theories in police work that animate a logic of enmity between policing services and protest movements who are successful at challenging issues of injustice.
Discussion and Conclusion: Crowd Theories and Strategic Incapacitation
In line with protest policing trends of strategic incapacitation, the actuarial models utilized by the RCMP supports Noakes et al.'s (2013) claims that repertoires of protest policing have taken a dramatic shift away from the negotiated management approach, which emphasized pre-event information sharing between police and protesters.
In the context of complex land struggles or movements demanding the respect of Indigenous rights, advocating the disruption of "successful" protests could not be more illustrative of strategic incapacitation's logic of penology that aims to manage the continued marginalization of Indigenous groups.
Through the use of qualifiers citing their "volatility," these individuals are also potentially identified for strategic incapacitation. Instances of protest are ranked for riskiness according to their potential for success, not criminality.
Given the power of Canada's "carbon-capital elite" (Carroll 2016: 226), the role of policing agencies in developing techniques of strategic incapacitation should be considered as an extension of the Canadian economy becoming "centred upon carbon extraction as a core industry." As for the SITKA investigation's final conclusions, they mirror the verdict that police and surveillance services in Canada find themselves increasingly at the beck and call of the resource extractive industry.