incandescent


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emission

 [e-mish´un]
1. a discharge.
2. an involuntary discharge of semen.
nocturnal emission reflex emission of semen during sleep.
thermionic emission the application of heat, such as to a filament, resulting in the emission of electrons and ions.

incandescent

Etymology: L, incandescere, to begin to glow
hot to the point of glowing or emitting intense light rays, as an incandescent light bulb.

incandescent

(ĭn″kăn-dĕs′ĕnt) [L. incandescere, to glow]
Glowing with light; white hot.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to a study by light-manufacturer Sylvania, about 50 percent of consumers are expected to switch from incandescent bulbs to CFLs, while about 25 percent will start using the more expensive LEDs.
The bulbs save energy (even more than CFLs), they're non-polluting (unlike CFLs), they don't become hot (like incandescent bulbs), they're 100 percent recyclable (at no cost to the consumer), they're rugged (harder to break and suitable for indoor or outdoor use) and they come in a variety of colors.
Some industry executives believe energy-saving fluorescent lamps will lead LEDs to fill the market vacancy left by incandescents due to relatively lower prices.
However, manufacturers have recently flipped the switch, creating LED bulbs that are bright enough to replace (soon-to-be extinct) incandescent products.
I think that within 25 years, fluorescent and incandescent will disappear altogether," he concluded.
In order to prepare unit owners for changing incandescent lighting legislation, Connected is disseminating information by including it in reports to each condo association, forwarding letters to each unit owner and posting on the company's intranet.
They have introduced legislation that would exempt traditional incandescent light bulbs manufactured within their states from federal efficiency requirements.
Noting that fluorescent bulbs use approximately 20% of the electricity used by the incandescent ones, Energy Minister James Robertson said Jamaica would save $79 million a year in energy costs, which would mean an 87-megawatt reduction in peak demand.
You can continue using your 100-watt incandescent bulbs next year, and you can replace those bulbs with other 100-watt incandescents that you may have in inventory.
By choosing to power lamps with electricity generated in an environmentally friendly way one can achieve more in ecological terms than by simply replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps," clarified Roland Hischier.
The Japanese government is planning to support a shift from incandescent bulbs to energy-saving fluorescent bulbs in an effort to cut electricity consumption, and thus carbon dioxide emissions, government sources said Wednesday.