inassimilable

inassimilable

 [in″ah-sim´ĭ-lah-b'l]
not susceptible of being utilized as nutriment.

in·as·sim·i·la·ble

(in'ă-sim'i-lă-bĕl),
Not assimilable; not capable of undergoing assimilation. See: assimilation.

in·as·sim·i·la·ble

(in'ă-sim'il-ă-bĕl)
Not easily incorporated; not capable of undergoing assimilation.
See: assimilation
References in periodicals archive ?
These immigrants cannot simply be deported, and if they remain in the US illegally, they will continue to constitute an inassimilable underclass.
As in Hanley's "Passion," it is broken by periods of silence and sleep, a stop-and-go that reflects both the inassimilable reality of the situation--that one man is indeed to stop forever with its end, and the other to go on--but is mirrored as well in the novel's structure, with its alternation between Adair's own past and present as his life comes to its own moment of crisis in the duty that now requires him to take another's.
Prior to the inassimilable and impending war, life is brave and amusing, and displeasures are quickly redressed.
Truly political art, however, should lead to innovation that is inassimilable for the bourgeois apparatus of production (Benjamin 1969 and 1978).
First the necessity to preserve what is inassimilable to anthropomorphism, and next a wariness concerning a logic of resemblance insinuating itself to analogies dedicated to indexing a nonhuman thought, persistently create problems for envisioning a thought beyond the human.
As the mode of the tentative and the liminal [...] meant to explore boundaries [...] or ceaselessly and failingly probe at the limits of representation and understanding, romance [...] presents that there is something unpresentable, inaccessible, inassimilable. (10) Thus, the Romance is an appropriate vehicle for the preoccupations of Possession.
The narrative hence makes a case for Melina's intrusion in the Marouns' lives and quells doubts about isolating the inassimilable Arab father and integrating his Arab American daughter.
(54) The primacy of the human subject in its naming of the world points, for Rigby, to a general negligence of "the diverse alterity of a flourishing more-than-human earth": an earth that always contains "an inassimilable otherness that overwhelms our ability to understand, command and consume it." (55) If such a critique may seem to depart so far from Heidegger's premises as to lose some of its bearing, Rigby's demand for Romantic studies to stray from the Heideggerian matrix traditionally invoked by ecocriticism is all the more relevant.
L'inscription psychique de l'experience n'est possible qu'en << impressionnant>> un autre capable, par l'usage d'une surface sensible et malleable interne, de donner sens a ce qui restait en suspens, indefini, et de ce fait, inassimilable:
(84) It conceives the Other as radically inassimilable, oscillating between the positions of strangeness and similarity.
Regarding this, Bryce addresses what he sees as the two avowed "problems which cannot be avoided" concerning the unity of the nation: 'inassimilable' foreigners and the "great influx of Americans." Some immigrants, particularly those from Eastern Europe such as the Doukobors and Galicians, were often seen as 'not the stuff' of Canada.
Stephen Morton's reading of the novel pushes beyond Baiada and Dass to suggest that, while the story of Dulcie's part in the resistance is inassimilable to "a masculine narrative of anti-colonial struggle," she remains equally resistant to conventional modes of feminist "recovery" (2010, 502).