inarticulate

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inarticulate

 [in″ahr-tik´u-lat]
1. not having joints; disjointed.
2. uttered so as to be unintelligible; incapable of articulate speech.

in·ar·tic·u·late

(in'ar-tik'yū-lăt),
1. Not articulate in speech.
2. Unable to express oneself satisfactorily in words.

inarticulate

(ĭn′är-tĭk′yə-lĭt)
adj.
1. Uttered without the use of normal words or syllables; incomprehensible as speech or language: "a cry ... that ... sank down into an inarticulate whine" (Jack London).
2. Unable to speak; speechless: inarticulate with astonishment.
3. Unable to speak with clarity or eloquence: an inarticulate debater.
4. Going unexpressed: inarticulate sorrow.
5. Biology Not having joints or segments.

in′ar·tic′u·late·ly adv.
in′ar·tic′u·late·ness, in′ar·tic′u·la·cy (-lə-sē) n.

in·ar·tic·u·late

(in'ahr-tik'yū-lăt)
1. Not fluent in the form of intelligible speech.
2. Unable to satisfactorily express oneself in words.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence, the soul is permanent, the body not,--(VI.508-514) That the stuttered word now means more than a wishful denial of temporality, or a sheer inarticulacy, is shown by the word-for-word repetition of the passage that had opened Book I.
The same show of inarticulacy is made when Tom speaks at Anna's wedding.
Grandt's repeated deployment of the phrase "telling inarticulacy" recalls Edouard Glissant's opacite (opaqueness) and Brent Hayes Edwards's decalage, both of which posit difference as that which is to be negotiated rather than resolved.
These words of wisdom from the past--not-so-distant in the case of Beuys or Motherwell--seem almost designed to chastise present-day artists for their inarticulacy and apparent disregard for tradition.
(1.5.270-72) This repetition of "homme" demonstrates more than just Orgon's inarticulacy or even Tartuffe's human weakness; the point is also that he is a man and not a woman.
Hayes sees her inarticulacy as the result of a clash of genres, emphasising "the way she is confronted by the divergent forms of sociability asserted by the countergenre that is unfolding around her"; in doing so, he unconsciously duplicates Mrs Curren's own tendency to interpret her experience in literary terms.
In "The Primacy of Good" (chapter 5), Brewer argues that in ethics, naturalistic "buck-passing" of values to either nonevaluative properties or reasons for action produces either vicious circularity or substantial evaluative inarticulacy. Explaining a mathematical proofs elegance strictly through its nonevaluative properties results in vicious circularity: "a proof is elegant just in case it has those properties that justify our construing it as elegant." Against this, Brewer argues that elegance (or other aesthetic and moral properties) can only be apprehended through a direct experiential appreciation of its value.
To call something "murky" is at once to evoke rural mud and linguistic inarticulacy: this "murkiness" is apparently responsible not only for Mary's inability to speak and to name her experience but for the incestuous sexual assault itself.
(87) Hursthouse is especially vulnerable here, since she holds that "[vjirtue must surely be compatible "with a fair amount of inarticulacy about one's reasons for action." Hursthouse, p.
A few years ago, the Racing Post ran a project called 100 Favourite Horses, and you, me, them, everybody wrote in to try to articulate the inarticulacy of unexpected affection.
Young people need to hear it done often, and done well, to head off the inarticulacy that produces kindalike, sort of, you know ...
In their ethical act of answerability, being overwhelmed by the inarticulacy of expression, writers live on with the impossible possibility of bearing witness: impossible because the testimonial utterance is ineffable; possible because it can neither be denied nor even postponed.