inappropriate care

inappropriate care

Care which, according to the RAND Corporation, is defined as '…that for which the expected risks or negative effects significantly exceed the expected benefits for the average patient with a specific clinical scenario.'
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some authors refer, in this context, to both futile and inappropriate care. [7] Care is considered futile when there is no chance of achieving any physiological goal.
Others seek inappropriate care at patent medicine stores or local pharmacies.'
Just over half (53 percent) cited overuse of care due to employees seeking inappropriate care.
'In many cases pregnant women dies due to inappropriate care and lack of healthy foods which causing maternal mortalities in the District.' Health officials said adding lady gynecologist has been performing her duties from past many days and routinely checking maternal cases.
Having such a comprehensive look at a patient could avoid inappropriate care, reduce medication load, and improve the whole health of the patient.
When healthcare organizations incorporate this type of credit and reference data into their revenue cycle workflows, they will also be able to address clinical, administrative, and quality improvements like preventing inappropriate care, redundant tests, and medical errors, as well.
"This placed vulnerable people at increased risk of unsafe and inappropriate care."
It is in everyone's interest to give patients and providers incentives to avoid unnecessary and inappropriate care. But if we are going to move to a health care system that rewards value, we must work together to make sure that asking patients to share more of the cost aligns with care that achieves better outcomes.
Using the quote, What you allow is what will continue, she urged nurses to speak out against inappropriate care, workplace bullying and harassment, domestic violence and child poverty.
Prof Steve Field, the watchdog's chief inspector of general practice, said in a damning report: | There was a lack of systems in place to safeguard children and vulnerable adults from abuse; | | | Recruitment systems did not protect patients from receiving inappropriate care and treatment; | There was a lack of overview of the infection control systems; | There was no system in place to ensure lessons were learnt from complaints and that action was taken.