inanition


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inanition

 [in″ah-nish´un]
the exhausted state due to prolonged undernutrition; starvation.

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn),
Severe weakness and wasting as occurs from lack of food, defect in assimilation, or neoplastic disease.
[L. inanis, empty]

inanition

(ĭn′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Exhaustion, as from lack of nourishment or vitality.
2. The condition or quality of being empty.

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn)
Severe weakness and wasting as results from lack of food, defect in assimilation, or neoplastic disease.

inanition

A state of exhaustion or a bodily disorder arising from lack of any of the nutritional elements such as calories, protein, vitamins, minerals or water.

Parrot,

Jules Marie, French physician, 1829-1883.
Bednar-Parrot syndrome - Synonym(s): Parrot I syndrome
Parrot atrophy of the newborn
Parrot nodes - Synonym(s): Parrot sign
Parrot pseudoparalysis - syphilitic osteochondritis in newborns causing pseudoparalysis in one or more extremities. Synonym(s): syphilitic pseudoparalysis
Parrot sign - indicates congenital syphilis in newborns. Synonym(s): Parrot nodes
Parrot I syndrome - pseudoparalysis; periarticular swelling, onset seldom after 3 months of age. Synonym(s): Bednar-Parrot syndrome; Parrot syphilitic osteochondritis
Parrot II syndrome - failure to thrive, emaciation, edema, dry skin, with subcutaneous fat loss, abdomen flat or distended, hypothermia, slow pulse, decreased metabolic rate. Synonym(s): marasmus; infantile atrophy; inanition; athrepsia
Parrot syphilitic osteochondritis - Synonym(s): Parrot I syndrome
Parrot ulcer - seen in stomatitis or thrush

in·a·ni·tion

(in'ă-nish'ŭn)
Severe weakness and wasting due to lack of food, defect or disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
For this reason, misclassifying patients as early initiators is more likely to occur among sick or frail patients because they are at greater risk of sarcopenia or protein inanition, with resultant lower levels of serum creatinine and falsely high levels of eGFR.
While this passage illustrates the standard fallen woman trope, Mary's self-description as a "wretched victim of sensuality" (61) clearly demarcates the boundary between the nationally edifying sensibility offered by Wollstonecraft and the "excessive sensibility" disparagingly associated with revolution and synonymous with unbridled passion, sexual license, and mental inanition. Mary, in fact, having been "rendered, by all the previous habits of life and education, systematically weak and helpless" (65), validates preconceptions of femininity as being intrinsically tied to the vitality of the nation-state (Mellor 65).
Nonetheless, the study reports on all the target population (i.e., target clinics), which were low-performing clinics on the selected measures for an extended period of time (over a year before the inanition of the project), and for which a major change in quality improvement rate was observed only after the interventions were initiated.
In the field, the capture rate of ant-lion larvae is quite reduced (Heinrich and Heinrich 1984) and, since smaller larvae do not manage to efficiently seize their prey in the first attack, they start suffering from inanition. Faria et al.
If untreated the disease will lead to more serious complications, including bone loss and fractures, inanition, birth defects in pregnancy, increased risk of a miscarriage.
Politics and nature abhor inanition. Unlikely elements tend to slink in and weasel their way in to control.
Although the cause of death of the infant was likely inanition and acute dissemination of an umbilical infection to a kidney, detection of HMPV as the sole pathogen in the infant tissues supports the presence of this agent in the gorilla group during the respiratory disease outbreak.
His first human transfusion was performed in 1818 on a man who 'was dying from inanition induced by malignant disease of the pylorus'--Blundell obviously chose a hopeless case for his first clinical experiment, and he wrote: 'Considerable temporary benefit followed the transfusion, but, as was to be expected in such circumstances, the man after some hours sank again into a state of exhaustion and died 56 hours later'.
Meyers' subtitle nicely indicates how he accounts for Johnson's overcoming these hateful contraries: while he spent months, even years in various states of inanition, Johnson "always enjoyed a fight" (5) and eventually roused himself to "Struggle:' Readers interested in the sometimes gritty details of Johnson's life--his arrests for debt, the specifics of his income--will do well to turn to Meyers; readers interested in how others saw Johnson--in Johnson as a biographical subject--will do well to turn to Martin.
self-inflicts the breviary of its inanition: each like a corporation
Inappetence and/or inanition may have caused reduced condition since food was not thought lacking and the growing season over the study period had increased by up to 39 days (Murray et al.
In many of her articles, Fern encourages women to cultivate private dispatches as a means of rebelling against the monopoly of masculine convention and preserving themselves from the inanition of a subordinated married life.