ITS

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ITS

Abbreviation for:
Independent Tribunal Service (now, the Appeals Service) 
inferior temporal sulcus
Initial Tracing Service  
insulin-transferrin-selenium
intertubercular sulcus
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The upcoming 2010 CES will feature the latest in-vehicle technologies that will soon be on store shelves, including advancements in portable GPS, location based services, in-car video, wireless technology and integrated products for combining entertainment with navigation and security.
Getting telecommunications and the associated information displays into every vehicle is going to be less of a priority" in the immediate future, but this will allow more time for test and development of the infrastructure, data protocols and in-vehicle technologies.
--Although wireless phones, sophisticated entertainment systems, and other in-vehicle technologies can impair a driver's ability to drive safely, new safety measures such as ambient light sensing are now in the forefront to reduce driver distraction caused by these automobile extras.
General Motors has teamed up with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign for a multiyear study on driver distractions and how well humans interact with in-vehicle technologies. Researchers hope to learn how motorists focus on the driving task when facing distractions such as vehicle instruments and other in-vehicle technologies.
Similarly, NHTSA has concentrated significant resources to build a driver simulation system that will be used, for the most part, to study the topic of driver distraction resulting from the use of in-vehicle technologies.
Leading the way is telematics-a seamless integration of in-vehicle technologies including car audio, digital wireless phones, navigation systems, satellite radio, television, DVD, e-mail, and Internet access.
Contrary to what some drivers may think, hands-free, handheld and in-vehicle technologies are not distraction-free, even if a driver's eyes are on the road and their hands are on the wheel.
"There is a looming public safety crisis ahead with the future proliferation of these in-vehicle technologies," said AAA president and CEO Robert Darbelnet, in a statement.
In fact, CEA estimates that sales of in-vehicle technologies will top US$9.3 billion this year in the U.S.