in vitro


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Related to in vitro: in vivo

in vitro

 [in ve´tro] (L.)
within a glass; observable in a test tube; in an artificial environment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in vit·ro

(in vē'trō), The term is properly hyphenated when used attributively (in-vitro inhibition of aldolase) but not when it stands as an adjectival or adverbial phrase (inhibition of aldolase in vitro).
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube or culture medium. Compare: in vivo.
[L. in glass]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

in vitro

(ĭn vē′trō)
adv. & adj.
In an artificial environment outside a living organism: an egg fertilized in vitro; in vitro fertilization.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

in vitro

adjective Isolated from living organisms or systems, but artificially maintained; in a test tube, in glass; outside the body, or a living system.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in vitro

Isolated from living organisms or systems, but artificially maintained; in a test tube, in glass; outside the body. Cf In vivo.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in vi·tro

(in vē'trō)
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube or culture media.
Compare: in vivo
[L. in glass]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

in vitro

Occurring in the laboratory rather than in the body. Literally, ‘in glass’. Compare IN VIVO.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

in vitro

(of biological processes or reactions) made to occur outside the body of an organism in an artificial environment (vitro = glass). For example, in-vitro fertilization of human eggs in the laboratory prior to reimplantation in the mother. Compare IN VIVO.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

In vitro

A biological reaction occurring in a laboratory apparatus.
Mentioned in: Herbalism, Western
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

in vitro

Term referring to a measurement or a process taking place in a test tube. Example: the measurement of the cholesterol content of the crystalline lens done in a test tube.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

in vi·tro

(in vē'trō)
In an artificial environment, referring to a process or reaction occurring therein, as in a test tube.
[L. in glass]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Although serum has an inevitable ability to support oocyte maturation and embryo development in vitro, there are certain disadvantages.
Many studies have reported the effects of sucrose concentration on induction flowering in in vitro culture [13, 9, 14].
Regionally, the global in vitro fertilization market is segmented into North America, Latin America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East and Africa.
In the logistic regression model, the result variable was "lesions formation", and possible explanatory variables were the in vitro dose injected, the experiment and the animal.
The means of maturation and cleavage rates, different stages of in vitro development and relative gene expression in all groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-LSD Dunnett's test.
Kirby et al., "In vitro and in vivo improvement of islet survival following treatment with nerve growth factor," Transplantation, vol.
Some of the challenges faced by in vitro diagnostics market are the stringent regulatory policies and the various reimbursement issues.
Documented literature reveals that there is a limited literature reported by few workers on in vitro propagation of Swertia chirayita, where they have used the nodal explants, in vitro grown seedlings, nodal meristems, and immature seed culture [5-9].