in loco parentis


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

in loco parentis

[in lō′kō pəren′tis]
Etymology: L, in the parents' place
the assumption by a person or institution of the parental obligations of caring for a child without adoption.

in lo·co pa·ren·tis

(in lōkō pă-rentis)
Latin expression meaning in place of the parents; legal obligation of a nonparental authority to provide a level of care equal to that of parents.
References in periodicals archive ?
The in loco parentis function of "caring", as demonstrated by the director's intensive therapeutic involvement, inspired those neglected students to care more about their own academic success.
Missouri courts determine whether a stepparent stands in loco parentis by analyzing the manner in which the children are treated.
The court rejected the idea of in loco parentis by educational institutions as they exercised power over students in a similar fashion as parents having legal responsibilities over their child as minors (Kaplin & Lee, 1997).
Alabama State Board of Education (1961) the court rejected the notion of in loco parentis by schools having power over children as parents had over their child as minors (Kaplin & Lee, 1997).
Teachers are professionally deemed to be in loco parentis.
Loco sextet exercising in loco parentis consists of Caroline (Josephine de Meaux), an uptight Catholic girl with a latent swearing problem; Daniel (Lannick Gautry), a handsome self-satisfied stud; Joseph (Omar Sy), a lanky and jovial black guy taken with the zaftig camp nurse, Nadine (Marilou Berry); Truman (Guillaume Cyr), a lumpy outgoing French-Canadian, and Lisa (Julie Fournier), an attractive urban damsel who thinks she's the one on vacation.
Zirkel and Henry Reichner, "Is In Loco Parentis Dead?
The term son or daughter is defined in the FMLA as a biological, adopted, or foster child, a stepchild, a legal ward, or a child of a person standing in loco parentis, who is either under 18 years of age, or 18 years of age or older and incapable of self-care because of a mental or physical disability.
Drawing on the concept of a narrative, this article describes three basic patterns underlying the roles and relationships between parents and educators in urban schools: the deficit, in loco parentis, and relational narratives.
In "Welcome to the Pun-Free University" (page 40), David Weigel reports on how the principle of in loco parentis has returned with a vengeance to the nation's colleges, strangling not only student freedom but most of the fun out of higher education.