impulse

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Related to impulses: Nerve impulses

impulse

 [im´puls]
1. a sudden pushing force.
2. a sudden uncontrollable determination to act.
cardiac impulse a heartbeat palpated over the left side of the chest at the apex of the heart. See also point of maximal impulse.
impulse control disorders a group of mental disorders characterized by repeated failure to resist an impulse to perform some act harmful to oneself or to others. In spite of the act's being socially unacceptable or inconsistent with the rest of the person's personality or lifestyle, he or she feels pleasure or emotional release upon doing it. Disorders in this category include intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, pathological gambling, pyromania, and trichotillomania.
nerve impulse the electrochemical process propagated along nerve fibers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

im·pulse

(im'pŭls),
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
3. The action potential of a nerve fiber.
[L. im-pello, pp. -pulsus, to push against, impel (inp-)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

impulse

(ĭm′pŭls′)
n.
Physiology The electrochemical transmission of a signal along a nerve fiber that produces an excitatory or inhibitory response at a target tissue, such as a muscle or another nerve.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

impulse

Cardiac pacing An electrical stimulus delivered by a pacemaker Psychiatry A psychic striving; an instinctive urge
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

im·pulse

(im'pŭls)
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
3. The action potential of a nerve fiber.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

im·pulse

(im'pŭls)
1. A sudden pushing or driving force.
2. A sudden, often unreasoning, determination to perform some act.
[L. im-pello, pp. -pulsus, to push against, impel (inp-)]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about impulse

Q. Daughter's impulsivity is reduced to a great extent from those days when she used to be without medicines. My daughter was very impulsive before taking her medicines. Her impulsivity is reduced to a great extent from those days when she used to be without medicines and had a very high impulsive behavior. Now I have asked the doctor to take off the medicines as she is going well. But the doctor said that he cannot stop the medicines suddenly as it will have adverse effects in my daughter. What may be the reason? My daughter is well without medicines. This is causing me great confusion.

A. I certainly agree with goodday222. Your daughter's impulsive behavior may not be displayed because she is continuing to take the meds to control it. I do not think the meds your daughter is taking would fix the impulsive behavior.

From my experience, if you want your daughter to eliminate the impulsive behavior, you should make sure she starts participating in some regular physical activity. Running or swimming in a school program would be best, but soccer, basketball, or volleyball would also be good. Dance classes would also help (ballet, tap, modern, or jazz). I'm not suggesting a few times per month. I'm suggesting an intensive, lifestyle changing athletic program that she commits to for the next few years.

If she can do this kind of activity, then when you stop the meds for the summer, you will find she is growing up more appropriately and her impulsive behavior is reduced.

Rodger Bailey, MS

More discussions about impulse
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References in periodicals archive ?
Impulse purchases and sales promotions are two prominent characteristics of mall shopping.
Most shoppers buy on impulse (Welles, 1986; Nicholls 2001).
Level-dependent hearing protectors are increasingly used, not only at industrial workplaces, but also in the areas of exposure to acoustic impulses generated by firearms.
Summary: Gulf News asks residents how they deal with food cravings and impulses
Besides that, the training is gentle on the joints as electric impulses work directly on the muscles, therefore there is no pressure on the joints (i.e back, knee, hips and shoulders) and focuses on targeted muscle groups during the workout.
The impulse series or periodic impulses embedded in the bearing vibration signals carry essential information of the bearing condition.
Consuming impulses" Advances in consumer research 12(1) 23-27(1985)
The impulse noise consists of a sequence of impulses arriving at random (or regular--thus deterministic) time instants.
The heart's pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, regulates the timing of the phases by sending electrical impulses to the atria and ventricles.
Additionally, Coley and Burgess (2003) found that women were more likely to impulse buy as a means of mood management, another opposite finding of the current study.