imprinting


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imprinting

 [im´print-ing]
a rapid kind of learning of certain species-specific behavior patterns that occurs with exposure to the proper stimulus at a critical stage of early life.

im·print·ing

(im'print-ing),
A particular kind of learning characterized by its occurrence in the first few hours of life; determines species-recognition behavior.

imprinting

Molecular biology The variable phenotypic expression of a gene, depending on paternal or maternal origin, a function of the methylation pattern; imprinted regions are more methylated and less transcriptionally active; the 'imprints' are erased and generated in early embryonic development of mammals Examples Insulin-like growth factor-2 and its receptor, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelmann/happy puppet syndrome, Wilms' tumor. See Allele, Gene, Genomic imprinting, Inheritance, Locus Psychology Developmental learning restricted to certain early, critical or sensitive time periods of life, which stops when definitive learning occurs or when a critical period has passed; it is irreversible and characteristic of the species of organism being imprinted. See Critical period.

im·print·ing

(im'print-ing)
A particular kind of learning characterized by its occurrence in the first few hours of life, which determines species-recognition behavior.

imprinting

1. The rapid early development in young animals of recognition of the ability to recognize and to be attracted to others of their own species or to similar surrogates.
2. In genetics, changes that occur in a gene in passing through the egg or the sperm so that maternal and paternal alleles differ at the start of embryonic life.

imprinting

  1. an aspect of learning where there is the rapid development of a response to a particular stimulus at an early stage of development. Young animals ‘recognize’ the first object they see as a mother figure, and they can be ‘imprinted’ by objects other than members of their own species. For example, Konrad LORENZ ‘imprinted’ himself as a mother figure on young greylag geese. Imprinting also occurs in other areas of experience, for example, bird song, where young, inexperienced birds have adult calls ‘imprinted’ on them.
  2. see GENOMIC IMPRINTING.

Imprinting

Process that silences a gene or group of genes. The genes are silenced depending on if they are inherited through the egg or the sperm.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 3 presents the equilibrium frequencies of the [T.sub.2] allele in populations with four different types of asymmetrical sexual imprinting acting.
Speaking to future plans, Imprinting Systems looks to continue building its book of short run jobs, defined by Kessler as a run with one to two thousand labels.
It is be concluded that the template plays an important role on the performance of imprinting membrane used for chiral resolution facilitated permeation through imprinted gates in the membrane and directly influence on selective rejection and selective adsorption.
"A large number of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells was activated simultaneously when the epigenetic control provided by genomic imprinting was removed," said Venkatraman.
"We saw that the defects in bimaternal mice can be eliminated and that bipaternal reproduction barriers in mammals can also be crossed through imprinting modification.
Du, "Preparation and recognition performance of cytisine alkaloid-imprinted material prepared using novel surface molecular imprinting technique," Journal of Separation Science, vol.
For the imprinting of MTD, two main functions were recognized: phenyl ring and the center that tolerates an amino acid carbon with amine and carboxyl groups [18, 23].
The more complex the information, the higher its cognitive load, this increases the time it takes to learn it and also its cognitive volatility.7 Master teachers do so in ways that boost cognitive imprinting by lowering the processing load of information for students.
This term is necessary, because mamsmals have unique epigenetic mechanisms, such as X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and genomic imprinting, as well as certain unique genes acquired from retroelements, such as retrotransposons and retroviruses.
Additional analyses will be important for comparing the maintenance of epigenetic controls associated with XCI and genomic imprinting in normal and transformed human cells.
Tribe (1973) [2] hypothesized that cells in mitosis tend to rupture during imprinting. Considering the accuracy observed by different workers with our findings suggest, that if imprint and scrape smear are employed as adjuvant to histopathological study, it will be extremely useful in arriving the correct diagnosis.
Monomers used during imprinting can be divided into acidic, basic, and as neutral ones and selection of the appropriate functional monomer is done based on the type of the used template and targeted molecules.