imprinting


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

imprinting

 [im´print-ing]
a rapid kind of learning of certain species-specific behavior patterns that occurs with exposure to the proper stimulus at a critical stage of early life.

im·print·ing

(im'print-ing),
A particular kind of learning characterized by its occurrence in the first few hours of life; determines species-recognition behavior.

imprinting

/im·print·ing/ (im´print-ing) a species-specific, rapid kind of learning during a critical period of early life in which social attachment and identification are established.

imprinting

Etymology: Fr, empreindre, to impress
(in ethology) a special type of learning that occurs at critical points during the early stages of development in animals. It involves behavioral patterning and social attachment, is characterized by rapid acquisition and irreversibility, and is usually species-specific, although animals exposed to members of a different species during this short period may become attached to and identify with that particular species instead of their own. The degree to which imprinting occurs in human development has not been determined. See also bonding.

imprinting

Molecular biology The variable phenotypic expression of a gene, depending on paternal or maternal origin, a function of the methylation pattern; imprinted regions are more methylated and less transcriptionally active; the 'imprints' are erased and generated in early embryonic development of mammals Examples Insulin-like growth factor-2 and its receptor, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Angelmann/happy puppet syndrome, Wilms' tumor. See Allele, Gene, Genomic imprinting, Inheritance, Locus Psychology Developmental learning restricted to certain early, critical or sensitive time periods of life, which stops when definitive learning occurs or when a critical period has passed; it is irreversible and characteristic of the species of organism being imprinted. See Critical period.

im·print·ing

(im'print-ing)
A particular kind of learning characterized by its occurrence in the first few hours of life, which determines species-recognition behavior.

imprinting

1. The rapid early development in young animals of recognition of the ability to recognize and to be attracted to others of their own species or to similar surrogates.
2. In genetics, changes that occur in a gene in passing through the egg or the sperm so that maternal and paternal alleles differ at the start of embryonic life.

imprinting

  1. an aspect of learning where there is the rapid development of a response to a particular stimulus at an early stage of development. Young animals ‘recognize’ the first object they see as a mother figure, and they can be ‘imprinted’ by objects other than members of their own species. For example, Konrad LORENZ ‘imprinted’ himself as a mother figure on young greylag geese. Imprinting also occurs in other areas of experience, for example, bird song, where young, inexperienced birds have adult calls ‘imprinted’ on them.
  2. see GENOMIC IMPRINTING.

Imprinting

Process that silences a gene or group of genes. The genes are silenced depending on if they are inherited through the egg or the sperm.
Mentioned in: Prader-Willi Syndrome

imprinting

a kind of learning in the very young based mainly on maternal attachment and acquisition of basic behavior patterns.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking to future plans, Imprinting Systems looks to continue building its book of short run jobs, defined by Kessler as a run with one to two thousand labels.
It is be concluded that the template plays an important role on the performance of imprinting membrane used for chiral resolution facilitated permeation through imprinted gates in the membrane and directly influence on selective rejection and selective adsorption.
A large number of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells was activated simultaneously when the epigenetic control provided by genomic imprinting was removed," said Venkatraman.
The PROSPER S-Series Imprinting Systems include the S5, S10, S20, and S30, available in black or CMYK configurations.
Genomic imprinting of PPP1R9A encoding neurabin l in skeletal muscle and extra-embryonic tissues.
A better solution would be to combine these two methods, whereby in imprinting the covalent interactions and in rebinding the non-covalent interactions are used and the so-called 'semi-covalent method' is obtained [15].
It indicated that the group of -NH- in the organophosphorous pesticides used played an important role in molecular imprinting and molecular recognition, which could be involved in hydrogen bonding with -COOH of MAA.
Relatively poor imprinting was observed for tetracyclines.
In this strained act of imprinting, Johns' concern was not the head per se, but the body more generally, and especially its envelope, the skin.
Several ethologists and students of animal behavior have suggested that sexual imprinting might play a role in the evolution of conspicuous characteristics, might generate sexual selection, or may increase the likelihood of speciation (Beach and Jaynes 1954; Mainardi 1964; Payne 1973; Immelmann 1974, 1975; ten Care and Bateson 1988; Plotkin 1988; Gould and Gould 1989; ten Cate 1991).
Inkjet printing inline with offset printing delivers a number of significant benefits, including faster job turnaround time, lower costs, and higher productivity for high-volume imprinting applications when compared to sheetfed laser printing.
The remarkable molecular imprinting technique can be used for chiral resolution [1 2].