impression

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impression

 [im-presh´un]
1. a slight indentation or depression, as one produced in the surface of one organ by pressure exerted by another.
2. a negative imprint of an object made in some plastic material that later solidifies.
3. an effect produced upon the mind, body, or senses by some external stimulus or agent.
basilar impression

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn),
1. A mark seemingly made by pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially during cadaveric dissections. See also groove for the various impressions of the lungs, for example, descending aorta, subclavian artery, and vena cava. Synonym(s): impressio [TA]
2. An effect produced on the mind by some external objects acting through the organs of sense. Synonym(s): mental impression
3. An imprint or negative likeness; especially, the negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling plastic impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]

impression

(ĭm-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Dentistry An imprint of the teeth and surrounding tissues, formed with a plastic material that hardens into a mold for use in making dentures, inlays, or plastic models.

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn)
1. A mark seemingly made by the pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially in cadaveric dissections. See also groove for the various impressions of the lungs, e.g., descending aorta, subclavian artery, and vena cava.
2. An effect produced on the mind by some external object acting through the organs of sense.
3. An imprint or negative likeness; especially, the negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling elastic gel impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
Synonym(s): impressio [TA] .
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]

impression

In dentistry, a negative mould of the teeth or other mouth structures, made in plastic, which is later filled with Plaster of Paris to provide a perfect copy of the anatomy.

Impression

An imprint of the upper or lower teeth made in a pliable material that sets. When this material has hardened, it may be filled with plaster, plastic, or artificial stone to make an exact model of the teeth.
Mentioned in: Malocclusion

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn)
1. [TA] An imprint or negative likeness; especially, negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling plastic impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
2. [TA] Mark seemingly made by pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially during cadaveric dissections.
3. Effect produced on the mind by some external objects acting through the organs of sense.
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Only LSD test between group A and C showed insignificant difference, it is possibly because of the inferiority of one step and two step conventional impression technique which cannot provide enough space for wash and the wash bulk is uneven lead to distortion on the result.
In 1952, alginate impression technique was de scribed as a nonpressure type of impression24 followed by minimum pressure denture impression technique in 195625 and later on in 1979, dynamic impression technique was described which is based on the assumption that every patient has a steady and characteristic oral functional pattern.26 All these impression tech niques were practiced in the following years in patients requiring simple to complex prosthesis.
Bilir, "Comparison of digital and conventional impression techniques: evaluation of patients' perception, treatment comfort, effectiveness and clinical outcomes," BMC Oral Health, vol.
[16.] Herekar M, Sethi M, Fernandes A, Kulkarni H (2013) A physiologic impression technique for resorbed mandibular ridges.
An implant-retained auricular impression technique to minimize soft tissue distortion.
[9,10] However, large gaps can cause problems because they favor bacterial colonization increasing inflammation of the tissues surrounding the implants; [9] marginal fits of up to 100 [micro]m are clinically acceptable, [9] and these problems may be closely linked to transfer impression techniques.
Using the impression technique, the creep deformation of the PMR-15 resin was studied in the temperature range of 563-613 K and the punching stresses of 76-381 MPa.
Fabricating a simple closure guide for the dual-arch impression technique. J Prosthet Dent 2001; 85(4):418.
Aside from the impression technique, the materials used are also very important in order to obtain gypsum casts.
The study showed that most commonly used impression technique among practitioners in Karachi was putty reline dual mix without spacer, out of the total 35.1% general dentists used this technique while 70.6% prosthodontists preferred it.