imponderable


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imponderable

(ĭm-pŏn′dĕr-ă-bl) [L. in-, not, + pondus, weight]
Incapable of being weighed or measured.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As a book, Imponderable grants Oursler some control over his tale; for instance, materials are sequenced somewhat chronologically.
IMPONDERABLE is what I call an Alternate Numerical Tautonym and SOFTENED an Alternate Numerical Palindrome.
You see how problems can be so imponderable, and insane,
The big imponderable with Tottenham is what kind of performance we can expect from them.
Today in the early months of 2003, the industry is working within a less than exuberant economy, upward gasoline prices, a rather shrill attack on bigness, softening leading indicators, threatening CAFE actions and a major imponderable in the Persian Gulf.
The question of how much risk a firm is taking appears to be an imponderable, unanswerable question that the industry has dealt with by adopting rules of thumb, such as premium-to-surplus ratios or, more recently, risk-based capital measures.
Despite all the talk about the importance of experienced managers in producing results, it's still an imponderable. It could be argued that a medical director with ten years experience can solve a patient problem quicker than someone with one year's experience.
Rather, it is the synthesis he brings to his enormous subject and the accessibility he gives to topics that in others' hands frequently seem either ponderous or imponderable. Porter's history is neither.
A second imponderable, and perhaps the most important one, is that shopping--going to the mall or downtown shops or big discount stores--is a social experience for many families.