implosion

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implosion

 [im-plo´zhun]

im·plo·sion

(im-plō'shŭn),
1. A sudden collapse, as of an evacuated vessel, in which there is a bursting inward rather than outward as in an explosion.
2. A type of behavior therapy, similar to flooding, during which the patient is given massive exposure to extreme anxiety-arousing stimuli by being asked to describe, and thus relive in imagination, those life events or situations typically producing these overwhelming emotional reactions. As the patient does so, the therapist attempts to extinguish the future influence of such unconscious material over the patient's behavior and feelings, and previous avoidance responses to the stimuli are replaced by more appropriate responses.

implosion

/im·plo·sion/ (im-plo´zhun) see flooding.

implosion

[implō′zhən]
Etymology: L, im + plaudere, to strike
1 a bursting inward.
2 a psychiatric treatment for people disabled by phobias and anxiety in which the person is desensitized to anxiety-producing stimuli by repeated intense exposure in imagination or reality, until the stimuli are no longer stressful. Also called flooding. implode, v.

im·plo·sion

(im-plō'zhŭn)
1. A sudden collapse, as of an evacuated vessel, in which there is a bursting inward rather than outward as in explosion.
2. A type of behavior therapy, similar to flooding, during which the patient is given massive exposure to extreme anxiety-arousing stimuli.

im·plo·sion

(im-plō'zhŭn)
Sudden collapse, as of an evacuated vessel, in which there is a bursting inward rather than outward as in an explosion.

implosion

flooding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fish & Wildlife Service National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) The November 2015 implosion of Pier E3 proved that the implosion demolition was not only the most cost-effective option, but had an even lower environmental impact than expected.
Researchers have long explained those emissions as the result of extreme temperatures and pressures that build up during implosions.
In previous work, scientists studying damage to submarine propellers from such implosions found that bubbles formed at moderate pressure, at shallow depths, do the most harm.
To investigate reaction rates within single air bubbles in water, Didenko and Suslick laced the water with molecules that glow under ultraviolet light when bonded to compounds that form in the implosions.
These little implosions can nevertheless be so violent that the compressed gas within a collapsing bubble emits a flash of light (SN: 10/5/96, p.