implicit


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implicit

(ĭm-plĭ′sĭt) [L. implicare, to enfold, to involve]
1. Implied.
2. Contained inside something.
References in periodicals archive ?
WEDNESDAY, July 31, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of burnout seem to be associated with greater explicit and implicit racial bias among resident physicians, according to a study published online July 26 in JAMA Network Open.
The researchers also used surveys to measure implicit attitudes and explicit bias.
When it comes to psychology's treatment of the subject, that's largely because of the runaway popularity of the implicit association test (IAT), a computerized quiz that supposedly reveals your level of unconscious bias against marginalized groups.
In its place has risen a new approach: implicit bias training.
That's how I first came to understand the concept of implicit bias, long before I knew researchers had coined the term and tried to measure it.
The basic concept of "implicit bias" has been studied by academics for decades.
SAN ANTONIO -- Physicians and other health care providers may harbor implicit, or unconscious, biases that contribute to health care disparities, patient communication researcher Stacey Passalacqua, PhD, said at the annual meeting of the American College of Chest Physicians.
"That is one of the reasons why it is so important to have a diverse workforce, to have health care providers of different ethnicities, of different genders, or different backgrounds, because they are less subject to some of these implicit biases that we know are highly problematic in health care," she said in the interview.
In "Race on the Brain: What Implicit Bias Gets Wrong About the Struggle for Racial Justice" (who is the James E.
One way of overcoming some of these limitations is assessing automatically activated cognitive associations by means of implicit measures (De Houwer, Teige-Mocigemba, Spruyt, & Moors, 2009; Fazio & Olson, 2003).
The July 15 News article "Why are women lawyers leaving the profession" includes the insertion of the assertion that possibly the most prevalent reason women leave "and sadly the most difficult to weed out" (averred ABA President Hilarie Bass of Miami) is implicit bias.