abutment

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abutment

 [ah-but´ment]
the anchorage tooth for a bridge.
Abutment tooth. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.

a·but·ment

(ă-bŭt'ment),
In dentistry, a natural tooth or implanted tooth substitute, used to support or anchor a fixed or removable prosthesis.

abutment

/abut·ment/ (ah-but´ment) a supporting structure to sustain lateral or horizontal pressure, as the anchorage tooth for a fixed or removable partial denture.

abutment

[əbut′mənt]
Etymology: Fr, abouter to place end to end
a tooth, root, or implant that supports and provides retention for a fixed or removable dental prosthesis.
enlarge picture
Frontal view of abutment

Abutment

A term of art referring to the teeth on either side of a missing tooth or teeth, which are used to anchor a fixed or removable dental prosthesis or bridge.

a·but·ment

(ă-bŭt'mĕnt)
dentistry A natural tooth or implanted tooth substitute, used to support or anchor a fixed or removable prosthesis.

a·but·ment

(ă-bŭt'mĕnt)
In dentistry, a natural tooth or implanted tooth substitute, used to support or anchor a fixed or removable prosthesis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In each implant abutment type, definitive manufacturing machine marks were apparent that were perpendicular to the direction of scaling on both the abutment and the collar.
The efficiency of scalers in biofilm removal was tested by calculating the area covered by residual plaque in each area of interest on each implant abutment.
However, in some cases, the new materials caused more severe scratching and damage of the implant abutment surfaces tested.
Despite the new and innovative technology used in developing new materials to more efficiently and safely remove plaque and calculus from implant abutment surfaces, limitations still exist.
8,9) This has resulted in an emphasis on the surface of the prosthetic abutment as a means of minimizing plaque accumulation; most implant abutments now have a polished surface to eliminate roughness that may serve as a nidus for plaque formation.
The purpose of the present study was to compare the impact of scalers of different material composition on the surface of three widely-used implant abutments following biofilm removal in vitro, by assessing surface topography of the abutment and presence of residual bacteria using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).
Biofilm was grown on the implant abutments from the 3 manufacturers using a standard biofilm growth protocol from human plaque samples.
The therapist was blinded to the material composition of the scalers and implant abutments used.
Randomized controlled clinical trial of customized zirconia and titanium implant abutments for canine and posterior single-tooth implant reconstructions: Preliminary results at 1 year of function.