impervious


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to impervious: impervious soil

im·per·me·a·ble

(im-per'mē-ă-bĕl),
Not permeable; not permitting the passage of substances (for example, liquids, gases) or heat through a membrane or other structure.
Synonym(s): impervious
[L. im- permeabilis, not to be passed through]

impervious

(ĭm-pĕr′vē-ŭs) [L. impervius]
Unable to be penetrated.
References in periodicals archive ?
orthoimagery, as well as updating current impervious surface features.
The Arrow-Lock Sheet is made from specially formulated polyvinyl chloride resins extruded under high temperature and pressure to form an extremely dense and impervious liner.
For instance, when considered at the parcel scale, lower-density residential development often creates less impervious surface per acre than a higher-density alternative.
Both are impervious to dietary or medical treatment.
Impervious pavements commonly found in most parking lots collect oil, antifreeze, and other pollutants that can flow directly into wetlands, streams, and lakes when it rains.
According to the CDC's 1999 Guidelines for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, surgical drapes should be impervious to both blood and viral penetration.
The Lahontan Regional Water Quality Board imposed groundwater-quality requirements that Sanitation District officials say will mean installing impervious liners in new earthen storage basins, upping the plant expansion's expected $173 million cost by a preliminary estimate of $30 million.
falciparum, the result could be a parasite impervious to both treatments, warns Toshihiro Mita, a physician at Tokyo Women's Medical University.
The second examined built lots, and how the proportion of tree canopy, open space, and impervious surface affects ecosystem benefits to the site as a whole.
Seemingly impervious to the inconvenience of being upside-down, they bickered over minutiae while a ghostly silhouette emerged of a man hanging by his feet from a tree (something Khan did as a child).
Another misconception is that the regulations apply only when there is an increase in impervious area (i.
Our partners saw in the EHP Focus article "Paving Paradise: The Peril of Impervious Surfaces" (Frazer 2005) the statement on page A459: "Asphalt is one concern, as it contains coal tar pitch, a recognized human carcinogen.