imperception


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im·per·cep·tion

(im'pĕr-sep'shŭn),
Inability to form a mental image of an object by combining the sensory data obtained therefrom.
[L. in-, not, + per-cipio, pp. -ceptus, to perceive]

imperception

(ĭm″pĕr-sĕp′shŭn) [L. in-, not, + percipere, to perceive]
The inability to form a mental picture; lack of perception.
References in periodicals archive ?
These authors viewed social imperception as a specific learning disability, and saw socially imperceptive learners has having difficulty interpreting the behaviors of others, particularly in nonverbal communication such as reading the facial expressions of others.
Such imperception and lack of grace towards friends bringing material help is part of the make-up of the present British attitude to Germany, not least when the events of 1992 repeated the formula.
Depending on the theoretical perspective, unilateral neglect has been labeled hemineglect, spatial neglect, extinction, imperception or hemi-inattention.
In sections on the historical Peter, the New Testament, and later Christian traditions, they consider such topics as whether Peter was behind Mark's Gospel, reassessing Peter's imperception in the synoptic tradition, Peter moving the people to repentance in Luke-Acts, the early reception of Peter in 1 Clement and Polycarp's Philippians, and traces of Peter veneration in Roman archaeology.
That's where the concept of horizon, of background--and it's the answer that will lay at the basis of any reflection by Merleau-Ponty, with crucial implications in terms of his educational philosophy and ontological perspective-comes into play: the perception of an object is given by the silent but existing imperception of what surrounds it.