impassive

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Related to impassiveness: stolidity

impassive

(ĭm-păs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Devoid of or not subject to emotion.
2. Revealing no emotion; expressionless.

im·pas′sive·ly adv.
im·pas′sive·ness, im′pas·siv′i·ty n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The ref gave it," said Fulham boss Paul Bracewell with impressive impassiveness.
W]hat lurks most often behind this pretense to a cold scientific impassiveness in observing human nature is a soured and cynical emotionalism and a distinctly romantic type of imagination.
Demme often had to admonish her during takes to stop sympathizing with her character and maintain the appropriate impassiveness.
Others think of it not as impassiveness but as a small-town ethos that is partly Baker City's charm and partly the source of its problems.
Leslie pictorialized this turn of events by investing his subjects with a grim impassiveness and placing them back to back, as if posed to pace off in a duel.
The stiffness and impassiveness of Abraham dominate.
Parisians watched the proceedings with "perplexing impassiveness.
I think the insight that exists beyond the fringe of possible knowledge of the divine in the Iliad is that God loves humankind and each human being, that it is not impassiveness that exists in the heart of God but love.
Faced with a Carlo Scarpa or a Louis Kahn we appreciate the struggle for expression as the one manifests an idea through carefully laid layers of plaster, the other through skeins of translucent marble, and how both of them crave to conquer the impassiveness of in-situ concrete.
Another factor in all this is Zidane's physiognomy, not just its leanness and toughness, emblematized by his balding, graying, closely cropped skull, but its basic impassiveness (his expression barely changes after his brilliant cross results in a goal), which adds to the impression of an inner ferocity that, not at all paradoxically--think of the great stars of classic Westerns--could scarcely be more photogenic.
Thesp builds Espinosa into a battered existential hero, fascinating despite his impassiveness, a man bored by and detached from a world that has caused him suffering, who is also being convinced of his own superiority to it.
Perhaps her face was rigidly set--but that marmoreal impassiveness, that magnificent stolidity, as of a wonderful statue by some great sculptor working under the curse of the gods; this imposing, unthinking stillness of her features, had till then mirrored for him the tranquil dignity of a soul which he had thought himself--as a matter of course--the inexpugnable possessor.