impairment

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impairment

 [im-pār´ment]
1. a decrease in strength or value.
2. any abnormality of, partial or complete loss of, or loss of the function of, a body part, organ, or system; this may be due directly or secondarily to pathology or injury and may be either temporary or permanent. Examples include muscle weakness, incontinence, pain, and loss of joint motion. See also disability and handicap.
functional aerobic impairment (FAI) a ratio comparing the duration of a test performed by the patient with the duration of the test that would be expected for a healthy individual of the same age, sex, and activity level, expressed as a percentage.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

im·pair·ment

(im-pār'ment),
A physical or mental defect at the level of a body system or organ. The official WHO definition is: any loss or abnormality of psychological, physiologic, or anatomic structure or function.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

impairment

Public safety
Any condition in which a fire protection system (e.g., sprinkler systems, standpipe/hose systems, fire pumps, fire protection water supplies, fire mains, fire alarm systems, special extinguishing systems) cannot perform its designed fire safety function.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

impairment

Medtalk An objective handicap, partial disability, loss of function, anatomic or functional defect, which may be temporary or permanent–persisting after appropriate therapy, without reasonable prospect of improvement, ranging from mild to severe, the latter of which precludes any form of gainful employment. See Disability, Handicap, Hereditary hearing impairment, Nonsyndromic hereditary hearing impairment, Specific language impairment, Syndromic hearing impairment. Cf Disability, Incompetence.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

im·pair·ment

(im-pār'mĕnt)
Any loss or abnormality of psychological, physiologic, or anatomic structure or function.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

im·pair·ment

(im-pār'mĕnt)
Physical or mental defect at the level of a body system or organ. The official World Health Organization definition reads any loss of psychological, physiologic, or anatomic structure or function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about impairment

Q. What is impaired at .08 blood-alcohol content? Hello there, What is impaired at .08 blood-alcohol content?

A. The limit for workers to enter the protected area of a commercial nuclear power plant is 0.04. (I retired from one in July.)

So to answer your question directly, it impairs your ability to think, work, and make critical decisions.

It affects those around you, especially family if the person persists and drinks irresponsibly all the time.

Drinking affects one's ability to drive an automobile properly, not just for the driver, but for the safety of passengers and those in other autos. If you care for other people, you won't drink and drive.
Don't drink and drive. The law is far too lenient.

You can't get back what you lose when you drink irresponsibly.
What you lose may be things intangible that are the most precious in life.




Q. I would like to improve myself besides taking meds. Can any one advice me? Hi I’m Genaro with FM (Fibromyalgia). I am taking meds regularly which is prescribed by my physician. I would like to improve myself besides taking meds. Can any one advice me?

More discussions about impairment
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References in periodicals archive ?
Due to this impairment, the balance sheet value of the fresh products group does not include the acquisition cost allocations made in conjunction with an acquisition in 2012.
Social support and self-esteem among adolescents with visual impairments. Journal of visual impairment and blindness, 93, 26-37
The results showed the median whole person impairment rating was seven per cent for 131 claimants assessed with the fifth edition of the AMA guides, and four per cent for 118 claimants assessed with the sixth edition.
As per World Bank report, around one billion people or 15 per cent of world's population experience some form of physical or mental impairment with its prevalence being higher in developing countries.
According to the EEOC, a mental impairment is "[a]ny mental or psychological disorder, such as emotional or mental illness." Examples include: major depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders (including panic, obsessive compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders), schizophrenia, and personality disorders.
Best during the year of impairment or the three prior years.
Post-TIA Treatment, whatever the mechanism of residual impairment, researchers suggest that interventions be developed for primary care physicians in order that they can identify TIA patients who present with fatigue, psychological impairment, or cognitive impairment.
Participants were separated into two groups: those with and without visual impairments. The groups were matched for age (within 6 months) and gender.
Goodwill impairments have declined and companies have notably increased their use of Step 0, taking advantage of the optional qualitative screen introduced by FASB in 2011.
Results showed among 21 to 44 year olds with mobility impairments, 39.2 percent were smokers, compared with only 21.5 percent of adults without mobility impairments.
She further added that it was still unclear whether the evidenced-based treatments that are effective for the general population would be sufficient to help people with mobility impairments quit smoking, so it was speculated that they might need more intensive treatment.