immunosuppression


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Related to immunosuppression: Immunosuppressive drugs

immunosuppression

 [im″u-no-sŭ-presh´un]
inhibition of the immune response to unfamiliar antigens that may be present; used in transplantation procedures to prevent rejection of the transplant or graft, and in autoimmune disease, allergy, multiple myeloma, and other conditions.

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sū-presh'ŭn),
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness (tolerance), may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or may be caused by disease.

immunosuppression

/im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion/ (-sah-presh´un) prevention or diminution of the immune response, such as by radiation, antimetabolites, or specific antibody.immunosuppres´sive

immunosuppression

(ĭm′yə-nō-sə-prĕsh′ən, ĭ-myo͞o′-)
n.
Suppression of the immune response, as by drugs or radiation, in order to prevent the rejection of grafts or transplants or to control autoimmune diseases. Also called immunodepression.

im′mu·no·sup·pres′sant (-prĕs′ənt) n.
im′mu·no·sup·pressed′ (-prĕst′) adj.
im′mu·no·sup·pres′sive adj.

immunosuppression

[-səpresh′ən]
Etymology: L, immunis + supprimere, to press down
1 the administration of agents that significantly interfere with the ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic stimulation by inhibiting cellular and humoral immunity. Corticosteroids; cytotoxic drugs, including antimetabolites and alkylating agents; antilymphocytic antibodies; and irradiation may produce immunosuppression. Immunosuppression may be deliberate, such as in preparation for bone marrow or other transplantation to prevent rejection by the host of the donor tissue, or incidental, such as often results from chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer.
2 an abnormal condition of the immune system characterized by markedly inhibited ability to respond to antigenic stimuli. immunosuppressed, adj.

Immunosuppression

Techniques to prevent transplant graft rejection by the body's immune system.

immunosuppression

chemical, pharmacological, physical or immunological suppression of the normal response to foreign material (e.g. microorganisms, donor tissue)

im·mu·no·sup·pres·sion

(im'yū-nō-sŭ-presh'ŭn)
Prevention or interference with the development of immunologic response; may reflect natural immunologic unresponsiveness, may be artificially induced by chemical, biologic, or physical agents, or caused by disease.

immunosuppression,

n 1. the administration of agents that significantly interfere with the ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic stimulation by inhibiting cellular and humoral immunity. It may be deliberate, such as in preparation for bone marrow or other transplantation to prevent rejection by the host of the donor tissue.
2. an abnormal condition of the immune system characterized by markedly inhibited ability to respond to antigenic stimuli.

immunosuppression

diminished immune responsiveness; may occur following certain infections, notably viral infections such as retroviruses or herpesviruses (cytamegaloviruses), exposure to x-irradiation or toxic chemicals or be deliberately produced in transplantation patients by drugs or antilymphocyte serum.

therapeutic immunosuppression
treatment which suppresses immune function where it is contributing to the disease process. Includes immune-mediated diseases of the eye, hemopoietic system, skin, kidney and central nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 90 patients who received AN, 21% were due to technical failure, 20% to acute onset rejection and hemorrhage, 2% to hyperacute rejection, 3% due to primary non-function, 19% to permit weaning of immunosuppression, 12% to chronic or recurrent infections and 23% to other non-specific causes (Table 1).
We also found the cavities on chest radiographs to be frequent and significantly associated with less immunosuppression (CD4 count is [greater than or equal to]200/ [mm.
Strickler said: "Nonetheless, it must additionally be acknowledged that these associations between human papillomavirus-related cancers and markers of immunosuppression were of moderate strength, varied between cancer types, and await confirmation.
IMMUNOSUPPRESSION DRUG USE FOR INDUCTION IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION, 2003-2006 (%)
Notably, regardless of patients' level of immunosuppression, the rate of CDI recurrence remained substantially lower among patients treated with DIFICID.
The most interesting thing about these face allografts is that rejection of skin can be violent--survival of the simple skin graft has been the iconic stringent test of immunosuppression or tolerance since Sir Peter Medawar.
The current status of immunosuppression in 2005 is [that] it's a valid concept, it's not a standard treatment, and the best drugs and doses are not well defined," Dr.
Immunosuppression, both acquired and hereditary, has been described to increase the risk, for example, of drug-induced immunosuppression after organ transplantation, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and certain autoimmune diseases.
Other carcinogenic agents (such as tobacco and alcohol) along with chronic immunosuppression likely enhance the oncogenic potential of HPV-induced oral lesions in this patient population.
Many islet transplants are performed on diabetics who are undergoing the transplant of a kidney, enabling them to benefit from immunosuppression drugs, said Dr.
It provides an in depth look into the trends that have shaped today's use of transplant immunosuppression regimens, and details the current and future global market.
According to Stephen Bloch, MD, a member of Cylex's board, "We believe the best option for a transplant patient undergoing immunosuppression therapy is to receive individualized patient management from their clinicians.