immunological tolerance


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Related to immunological tolerance: hypersensitivity, Acquired immunological tolerance

immunological tolerance

The state in which the immune system does not react to the body's own antigens. It is caused by the destruction of lymphocytes that express receptors to autoantigens as they develop. Failure of these mechanisms may result in autoimmune disease.
See also: tolerance

immunological tolerance

the failure to respond to a potential antigen.

tolerance

the ability to endure without effect or injury.

drug tolerance
1. decreased susceptibility to the effects of a drug due to its continued administration.
2. the maximum permissible level of a drug in or on animal feed or food at any particular time relative to slaughter.
high-dose tolerance
in immunology, that induced by the intravenous administration of high doses of aqueous proteins.
immunological tolerance
specific nonreactivity of the immune system to a particular antigen, which is capable under other conditions of inducing an immune response. There is, under normal circumstances, tolerance to self-antigens; identical (monozygotic) twins and dizygotic cattle or sheep twins where there has been placental fusion and exchange of bone marrow stem cells are also tolerant of each other's tissues. Allophenic mice, that is mice produced by fusion of blastocysts from different mice are also tolerant of both 'parents'. The administration of antigens either at high or low dose and infection with certain viruses during critical early stages of immunological development may also induce tolerance.
tolerance level
the concentration of a drug or chemical permitted by law to be present in human food.
tolerance limits
the numerical limits within which a previously identified proportion of values of a variable, or observations in a population, can be expected to occur.
low-dose tolerance
that induced by repeated administration of low doses of the antigen.
oral tolerance
that induced by oral administration of the antigen.
self-tolerance
the non-reactivity of the immune system to self-antigens.
tolerance test
see tolerance test.
zero tolerance
when no detectable amount of a chemical substance is permitted in human food.
References in periodicals archive ?
This breakdown of immunological tolerance also compromises the effective presentation of antigens, with an impact on antibody production.
Bevan, PhD, FRS, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and University of Washington, will present "Regulation of the CD8 T Cell Response," and Shimon Sakaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences at Kyoto University, will speak on "Regulatory T Cells for Immunological Tolerance.
The genetic defect keeps the body from properly dealing with "errant" immune cells that it normally eliminates by a process called immunological tolerance.
Immunization was well tolerated with no evidence of autoimmune reaction or development of immunological tolerance by repeated immunization.
procedures and also in generating immunological tolerance to
Such hESC-derived hematopoietic cells have potential applications in bone marrow transplantation procedures and also in generating immunological tolerance to other hESC-derived transplanted cells.
The apparent mechanism of action of MBP8298 (dirucotide) is the induction or restoration of immunological tolerance with respect to ongoing immune attack as a result of high doses of peptide delivered periodically by the intravenous route.
Ralph Brinster, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, where he conducted research on developing transgenic mouse models for the study of induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance to tissue specific antigens.
The apparent mechanism of action of MBP8298 is the induction or restoration of immunological tolerance with respect to ongoing immune attack as a result of high doses of peptide delivered periodically by the intravenous route.