immortality


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immortality

(ĭm″or-ăl′ĭ-tē)
The ability of some cells, particularly cancer cells, to reproduce indefinitely. Normal human cells have a finite life expectancy. They may divide for a few dozen generations, but eventually stop reproducing and die.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of all the kinds of immortality available the type that lasts until the day you die is almost certainly the best one.
At seven pages, the briefest essay, "Mortal immortals: the fallibility of elven immortality in Tolkien's writing" by Anna Milon, also evokes Arwen: "Fading is another phenomenon significant of Elven mortality" (103).
But almost a quarter of those surveyed described themselves as very unlikely to choose immortality if such an option existed.
This story line provides room for discussion about immortality, technology, tolerance and respect of differences, and right versus wrong.--Lauren Arditti.
The immortality of stem cells is regulated by increased proteostasis, which controls the quality of proteins.
Immortality opened the 10th Sofia Middle East & North Africa Region (MENAR) Film Festival two weeks ago on January 18.
China's (http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-12/24/c_136848720.htm) Xinhua News reported Sunday that a new research revealed Ying Zheng  or Qin Shihuang, who created the world-famous terracotta army, ordered a nationwide hunt for the potion of immortality.
John Updike built up Willams's immortality bonafides in a famous essay after the retiring slugger hit a home run in his last at bat and refused to come out of the dugout to tip his cap.
That's already a pretty big leap of faith, and Istvan artfully capitalizes on it to issue his more extravagant claims for immortality.
VVGOOGLING a runner Ambrosia 1.50 Newmarket In ancient Greek myths, ambrosia is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it.
Immortality is something millions of us aspire towards but only a handful achieve.
Jacob Sider Jost's Prose Immortality, 1771-1819, tells the story of how the eighteenth century represents the afterlife.